Richard Parry

University of Edinburgh
Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh

Biography

I joined Social Policy in 1983 after working as a civil servant and as a researcher at the University of Strathclyde. I am a political scientist and my work falls in the interconnected areas of public policy, public administration and public sector resource allocation, especially in Scotland and the UK. Earlier research projects included ones on public employment, central-local relations in Scotland, comparative European social policy and privatisation in social policy.

Posts by this author

Scottish Independence rally

How Brexit and independence are unusual referendums

Richard Parry discusses how, five years on, the Brexit referendum will influence any future Scottish independence referendum.
Scottish Parliament election reaction

What happened? Where do we go from here?

Over the coming weeks, academics will respond to the 2021 election results. Today, Richard Parry reflects on the 2021 Holyrood election and what it might mean for the future.
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Uncovering the lid on St Andrew's House

As the devolved system attracts unprecedented attention in UK media, Richard Parry discusses the significance of the belated disclosure of sensitive advice at the heart of the Scottish Government.
image of 2020 in paper

Time stands still for Brexit but not Covid

As an epic year for global public policy reaches its end, Richard Parry discusses the way that the pandemic has impacted other aspects of the political cycle. 
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Under the spotlight: the civil service in the Scottish devolved system

Building on themes in his chapter in The Oxford Handbook of Scottish Politics, Richard Parry discusses the unprecedented scrutiny now being faced by Scottish civil servants. 
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Scotland, UK and Covid-19: The Unknown Looms

Richard Parry provides an update on policy relating to coronavirus in Scotland and the UK, reviewing how Nicola Sturgeon is coming from a position of political and epidemiological strength.