Posts by Centre on Constitutional Change

The 2020 Climate and Energy Package saw the EU become an increasingly important actor in climate and energy policy.  It set the legal and regulatory framework within which governments at every level across the 28 member states have developed their own policies. The EU has promoted and financed low... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
After three years of work, the International Panel on Social Progress has published a  three-volume report by on key challenges to society in the twentieth century. Volume 2 includes a section of The Paradoxes of Democracy and the Rule of Law coordinated by Donatella della Porta (Scuola Normale... Read more
Post type: Publication
  The United Kingdom’s Evolving Constitution   Michael Keating   La Evolución de le los modelos territoriales: Reformulación versus ruptura.           La teoria general de los derechos fundamentales en sus nuevos territorios y ensamblajes                      Edited: Paloma Requejo Rodríguez  
Post type: Publication
Brexit and the Nations   Michael Keating First published: 27 November 2018 https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-923X.12619   Brexit is presented as a move to restore British sovereignty. Initially this meant parliamentary sovereignty but the referendum may have replaced this with sovereignty of the British... Read more
Post type: Publication
Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from... Read more
Post type: Publication
  Changing Borders in Europe Exploring the Dynamics of Integration, Differentiation and Self-Determination in the European Union, 1st Edition Edited by Jacint Jordana, Michael Keating, Axel Marx, Jan Wouters This new book is the fruit of a collaboration between the Centre on Constitutional Change,... Read more
Post type: Publication
Fellows of the Centre on Constitutional Change respond to the rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement by the House of Commons and the impending no-confidence vote in the government. Professor Nicola McEwen, Co-Director of the Centre, said of the vote on the Withdrawal Agreement: “The government’s... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Xosé M. Núñez Seixas and Eric Storm eds., Regionalism and Modern Europe: Identity Construction and Movements from 1890 to the Present Day (London: Bloomsbury 2019) paperback, hardback and e-book. Providing a valuable overview of regionalism throughout the entire continent, Regionalism in Modern... Read more
Post type: Publication
The Centre has welcomed Pat Cox, former President of the European Parliament (2002-2004), as new member to its advisory board. Pat Cox was President of the European Parliament from 2002 to 2004, and a member of the European Parliament from 1989 to 2004. Previous to being an MEP, he was elected to... Read more
Post type: News Article
PRESS RELEASE13 November 2018For Immediate Release Experts from the Universities of Edinburgh and Cambridge have called for far-reaching reforms to the UK’s system of intergovernmental relations (IGR). The report, Reforming Intergovernmental Relations in the United Kingdom, provides the framework... Read more
Post type: News Article

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Latest blogs

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

  • 24th January 2019

    Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?

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