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Anyone watching the Labour leadership’s refusal to rule out a post-election agreement with the SNP, would be forgiven for thinking such an arrangement was unique. However, explains Daniel Cetrà, pro-independence parties offering support to minority governments is nothing new – as evidenced by Spain.

There has been a great deal of comment recently about the prospect of the SNP supporting a minority Labour government in Westminster.

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Polls indicate that the general election will see a fundamental rewriting of the Scottish political landscape, with the SNP poised for a near sweep. The party also seems poised to take over from Labour as leaders on the issue of women’s representation in this election at least, although it is far from clear whether that will translate into support for quotas in the future, write Meryl Kenny and Fiona Mackay.

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The turnout out for last year's referendum broke all records and is now the subject of extensive research. Dr Malcolm Harvey considers the experience and what implications it may, or may not, have for May's general election. This article originally appeared in The Herald.
 
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Malcolm Harvey on politics being anything but predictable. This post originally appeared in the print copy of the Press and Journal.
 
There are lies, damned lies, and statistics: a phrase frequently attributed to Mark Twain. In an election year, parties might do well to keep the quote in mind.
 
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This weekend's widely-publicised poll commissioned by Wings Over Scotland confirms research conducted by CCC Fellow Professor Ailsa Henderson last year that the Scots and English are not as far apart in terms of social attitudes as some might have us believe. This research was used as the focus of her chapter in Sex, Lies and the Ballot Box.

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David Eiser asks how much difference do economic arguments make to people’s attitudes and voting intentions? 

Whether the issue was currency choice, the affordability of future policy proposals, or the policy options available to a small, open economy in a globalised world, economic arguments were at the heart of Scotland’s referendum debate. 

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  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

  • 24th January 2019

    Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?

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