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Twenty years after the Belfast agreement was signed, new research identifies an enduring legacy. 
 
Fresh analysis of the Belfast or Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland has revealed its lasting impact on subsequent peace deals worldwide.
 
Key elements of the settlement between Nationalists, Republicans and Unionists and the Irish and British governments – agreed in Belfast 20 years ago – have been instrumental in other peace negotiations, the study reveals. 
 
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Robert A. Young (1950-2017)

Michael Keating remembers his friend and colleague Prof Bob Young who has passed away. Prof Young was a member of the Centre's advisory board and a tireless supporter of our work. 

The Centre's Asscoaite Director, Prof Nicola McEwen, has received an award recognising excellence in public engagement. 
 
CCC Associate Director, Professor Nicola McEwen, has been awarded the Political Studies Association’s (PSA) prestigious Public Understanding of Politics Award. 
 
The award was given for Prof McEwen’s work at the Centre on Constitutional Change helping the public grapple with the complexities modern politics. 
 
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If you’re staying up to watch the results of the elections tonight, you’ll have their choice of friends and fellows of the Centre to keep you company through the night and into Friday. 
 
You can join us on: 
 
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House of Lords Committee Appoints Prof David Bell as Adviser

Professor David Bell, a fellow of the Centre, has been appointed as the specialist adviser to the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee.
 
Professor Bell, based at the University of Stirling, will advise the committee in their inquiry into possible models for the devolution of public finances in the UK.
 

New ESRC Fellows Appointed

Professor Nicola McEwen has been appointed to one of four 'Knowledge Exchange' fellowships intended to inform and nuture public discussion around the area of consitutional change. McEwen is joined by Professor Richard Wyn Jones, of the University ofd Cardiff and also a Fellow of the Centre. 

The fellowships will run for six to eight months and will provide an opportunity for academics to work with community and public organisations in understanding the impact of constitutional change. 

Latest blogs

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

  • 24th January 2019

    Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?

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