Migration

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Report: Scotland Will Struggle to Compete for Migrant Workers

New research conducted by the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow suggests that a post-Brexit Scotland is likely to find itself losing out on much-needed low-skilled migrant labour from the European Economic Area (EEA) to English-speaking countries such as North America, Australia, and to countries within the EEA.

Free movement of workers has become one of the major stumbling blocks in Brexit negotiations. While most economists see continued access to the single market as crucial for the UK’s economic prosperity, the EU has consistently stated such access is not possible unless the UK accepts EU rules on free movement of workers. In other words, if you want to be in the club, you have to accept all of the rules, including admitting EU immigrants. This places UK negotiators in a difficult bind.
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Levels of EU migration to Scotland are lower than in the rest of the UK and, consequently says David Bell, issues relating to it are less likely to affect either side of the Brexit vote.

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Holyrood and Westminster could diverge on immigration

As reported in today's Herald (4 June 15), Scotland could take a different approach to the rights and roles of migrants than the rest of the UK.

Spotlight on Borders: Insights from the border between Sweden and Denmark

The latest SCCC briefing paper in our Spotlight on Borders series is now available. This paper focusses on the border between Sweden and Denmark and follows examinations of how borders elsewhere in Europe affect trade, migration, travel and working life.

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    The upcoming New Caledonian independence referendum on the 4th of November 2018 is the outcome of a 30 years-long process of gradual decolonisation. Dr Alexandra Remond examines the prospects.

  • 14th September 2018

    For Ireland, the Brexit discussion has focused heavily on the Irish issue. This has meant an unrelenting emphasis on securing a Brexit deal which ensures no border on the island of Ireland, and achieving a backstop provision which guarantees this scenario. The expectation is that this will be achieved in the context of the Withdrawal Agreement, and before the transition phase begins. Dr Mary C Murphy looks at what the Brexit transition period means for Ireland, North and South.

  • 13th September 2018

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  • 7th September 2018

    In the second of her blogs focusing on international trade issues, Dr Kristen Hopewell looks at some of the difficulties that the UK might face as it seeks to negotiate new bilateral agreements

  • 6th September 2018

    With little more than six months to go before the UK leaves the EU on 29 March 2019, the position of Scotland vis-à-vis the EU is not much clearer than it was in the immediate aftermath of the EU referendum more than two years ago. Dr Tobias Lock looks at what has Brexit meant for Scotland so far and what developments can we expect?

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