Economy

Hide tag: 
Show

What set-up costs would an independent Scotland face? The debate continues.

The work of LSE'S Professor Patrick Dunleavy was cited in a HM Treasury report on the set-up costs of an independent Scotland. In a blog for LSE British Politics and Policy, Professor Dunleavy challenged the use of his work, focused on the cost of setting up or substantially revamping a Whitehall department, saying:

Read More

Reindustrialising Scotland for the 21st Century: A Sustainable Industrial Strategy for a Modern, Independent Nation

The Scottish Government set out in Scotland’s Future and Building Security and Creating Opportunity: Economic Policy Opportunities in an Independent Scotland how the full economic policy levers of independence could be used to create a more successful and fairer economy.

This paper builds on a key theme set out in both reports - the objective of rebalancing and reindustrialising the Scottish economy.

IFS: Spending cuts or tax increases would be needed to pay for Independence White Paper giveaways

New calculations – based on forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) – suggest that an independent Scotland would face a budget deficit of 5.5% of GDP (£8.6 billion in today’s terms) in its first year of independence were it to inherit a population share of the UK’s national debt. This would not be sustainable for any prolonged period. Any upside surprise on oil revenues would help, for a while, but as recent experience demonstrates, these revenues can also disappoint.

Pages

Latest blogs

  • 21st June 2018

    New research conducted by the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow suggests that a post-Brexit Scotland is likely to find itself losing out on much-needed low-skilled migrant labour from the European Economic Area (EEA) to English-speaking countries such as North America, Australia, and to countries within the EEA.

  • 19th June 2018

    Following the collapse of the Rajoy government following a corruption scandal, how does the new political landscape affect the constitutional debate in Catalonia? Prof Antonia María Ruiz Jiménez of Universidad Pablo de Olavide suggests that this apparently dramatic change will make relatively little difference.

  • 13th June 2018

    While populist leaders and movements make headlines worldwide, an often more subtle majority nationalism remains an endemic condition of the modern world. This phenomenon is comparatively understudied. The Centre on Constitutional Change invites calls for abstracts for an international workshop on the topic of majority nationalism, to be held in February 2019.

  • 31st May 2018

    The recent report by the Growth Commission contains some interesting ideas, says Michael Keating, but also makes some problematic assumptions.

  • 30th May 2018

    The Scottish and Welsh Governments worked together closely during their negotiations with the UK Government over those aspects of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill that related to devolution. Despite ultimately choosing different paths, say Hedydd Phylip and Greg Davies, this spirit of cooperation looks set to continue.

Read More Posts