Economy

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In a guest blog, Frank Barry, Professor of International Business & Development at Trinity College Dublin, looks at the history of the Republic of Ireland’s economic policy and lessons for an independent Scotland.

Ireland’s separation from the United Kingdom in 1922 was achieved under very different circumstances from those prevailing today. Westminster had refused to accept the wishes of the Irish electorate as expressed in the 1918 General Election because of the consequences that the British government thought this would have had for the future of the Empire. 

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Oxford journal features ESRC teams’ economic work

The latest Oxford Review of Economic Policy features the work of ESRC Future of the UK and Scotland teams who have focused on the economic dimension of the independence debate.

Professor Ewart Keep of the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, at Oxford University, looks at the findings of the Scottish Government-commissioned review of workplace policies, chaired by Jim Mather, which were published on August 13th.

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David Eiser discusses the Scottish Economic Society and University of Stirling economists latest book which aims to bring together economic research that informs the debate, and presents it in a clear and succinct fashion.

It has been another week where economic issues have been at the fore of the independence debate, including the acknowledgment for the first time by the Bank of England Governor Mark Carney that the central bank has been contingency planning for the outcome of the referendum.

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Latest blogs

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

  • 25th July 2018

    Given that there are many policy differences between Northern Ireland and other parts of the UK, asks Jonathan Evershed, why has customs policy been singled out as a red line by Unionists?

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