Catalan Election

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The key to understanding the 2017 Catalan election is to be found in another vote that took place two years earlier and, says Luis Moreno, a realization that Catalan politics is polarized. 
 
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As politics in Catalonia becomes increasingly polarised over territorial concerns, finds Sandra León, those parties and policies that don't speak to the issues of sovereignty and relations with Madrid are being squeezed out. 

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In the light of the Catalan results both Madrid and Barcelona have some options, says Michael Keating, but the current political climate is unlikely to see an immediate breakthrough.

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The 2015 election in Catalonia has provided a clear mandate for the pro-secessionist movement but, argues Marc Sanjaume, there is no obvious institutional means to deliver it.
 
The results of the Catalan elections bear a close resemblance to Wittgenstein’s “Philosophical Investigations” duck-rabbit. That is they can be read simultaneously as a victory leading to a fast-track secessionist plan or as a defeat that would abort any attempt to pursue any pro-sovereignty step in Catalonia. 
 
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Although the overall levels of support for and against independence barely changed in the Catalan election, says Robert Liñeira, there have been sizable shifts within each bloc. 

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The changing situation in Catalonia needs to be understood again a context that includes a crisis of legitimacy in the Spanish political system more generally and a changing sense of scale in relation to states as a result of globalisation, says Josep Valles. 
 
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