British & Scottish Politics

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Already late, the launch of the SNP manifesto was held back until yesterday (30 May) by the Manchester bombing. The phrase ‘in Washington, everything is political’ now applies worldwide in the cynical world of professional politics but even the most hard-bitten were sobered by an attack on a demographic weighted to young women and children at one of the largest indoor arenas in Europe where life-threatening panic was superimposed on the explosion. 
 
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The fourth in a series of five podcasts coinciding with the UK General Election Campaign.This week Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alan Convery of the University of Edinburgh, School of Social and Political Science look at the UK nations and discuss whether this is a territorial election.

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The third in a series of five podcasts coinciding with the UK General Election Campaign.This week Professor Ailsa Henderson of the University of Edinburgh, School of Social and Political Science & Mark Diffley, Director at Ipsos MORI Scotland discuss the polls. What are they saying, how reliable are they, how should they be interpreted? Elections @ edinburgh gets behind the numbers on the GE2017 campaign trail.

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At one time, Scottish politics, like those elsewhere in Great Britain, divided rather clearly on the left-right axis, with elections disputed between Labour and the Conservatives. In the mid-twentieth century, they divided the vote fairly evenly between them. Since the 1970s, another axis has become significant, the unionist-nationalist divide. Now there is an additional one, on Europe, between Remain and Leave supporters. The old party system has broken down, creating instability and marked shifts in support from one election to the next.
 
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  • 16th August 2018

    A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

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