Reports & Briefings

ESRC Centre for Population Change, August 2014
Polish migrants are the largest non-UK born population in Scotland (56,000 in 2012). As EU citizens who are resident in Scotland, they are eligible to vote in the 18 September 2014 referendum on Scottish independence.
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Bettina Petersohn and Nicola McEwen: SCCC briefing paper, August 2014

Key points:

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Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change: Third report, August 2014

Report on the third of six events in the seminar series: Security in Scotland, with or without constitutional change

Key points:

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Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change, August 2014

UK-Irish interdependence today can provide valuable insights for Scottish-UK border relations, as some of the interdependences and the management of these could also apply to Scottish-UK border relations in the event of independence.

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Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change briefing, August 2014

Nicola McEwen

Key Points

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Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change briefing, August 2014

Stephen Tierney and Katie Boyle

Executive Summary

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Ailsa Henderson, Liam Delaney, Robert Liñeira, Future of the UK and Scotland, August 2014
On 18 September Scottish residents will have the opportunity to vote in a referendum on independence.  There have been numerous surveys tracking voter attitudes to independence and the website What Scotland Thinks provides a useful resource on general trends.
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ScotCen Social Research briefing, August 2014

Women are less likely than men to say they will vote Yes to Scottish independence this September. This paper uses data from the Scottish Social Attitudes survey (SSA) to explore this ‘gender gap’. It looks at where the gap is greatest and what, if anything, might explain it.

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ScotCen Social Research briefing, August 2014

In a previous ScotCen briefing it was shown that a third of all respondents to the 2013 Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2013 had not decided which way to vote in the referendum. This new briefing looks at who is still undecided, as measured by the 2014 survey.

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ScotCen Social Research briefing, August 2014

Scotland’s voters go to the polls on 18th September in order to choose whether to stay in the United Kingdom or to leave and become an independent country.

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