Research briefings

Gill Wyness briefing paper, August 2013

When deciding whether or not to seek independence from the UK, the Scottish electorate will need to consider how Scotland has fared in its governance of areas that are already devolved. Education is one such high-profile area of policy.

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IFS briefing note, 31 July 2013

There has been a growing debate about how the benefits system (that is, the system of state benefits, pensions and tax credits) may be affected if Scotland becomes independent.

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ScotCen Social Research briefing, June 2013

The Scottish referendum in 2014 will ask people one question - whether they think Scotland should be an independent country. Yet many surveys and polls suggest that another option – significantly

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Sheila Riddell, Linda Croxford, Sarah Minty, David Raffe, and Elisabet Weedon briefing paper, May 2013

The overall aim of this project is to consider the future challenges and opportunities faced by Scottish higher education in the case of further devolution or a vote for independence in autumn 2014. This think tank focuses on the future financing of Scottish higher education.

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ScotCen Social Research briefing, May 2013

Now that the date of the independence referendum has been announced, the debate about Scotland’s constitutional future is in full swing. It is proving to be a strongly contested affair. But how deep are the differences and divisions within the Scottish public on this subject?

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Nicola McEwen Project briefing, May 2013

Independence and Interdependence: In September 2014, Scots will pass judgement on whether Scotland should be an independent country. But what does it mean to be ‘an independent country’ in an interdependent world?

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ESRC Centre for Population Change briefing, April 2013

The forthcoming referendum on the constitutional future of Scotland has inevitably been the focus of considerable public debate.

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