Blogs & news

6th November 2018
post by Centre on Const...

One of the less anticipated features of Brexit has been the nature of the disputes between the UK Government and the governments of Scotland and Wales. In this guest blog, Mark Sandford and Cathy Gormley-Heenan from the Parliament and Constitution Centre of the House of Commons Library, discuss devolution, and how Brexit has impacted intergovernmental relations between the devolved governments.

5th November 2018
post by Stephen Tierney

One of the areas of devolved competence that may be affected significantly by Brexit is Justice and Home Affairs (JHA). In this blog post, Professor Stephen Tierney explores the repatriation of JHA competences and the implications for devolution. This coincides with the publication of a new research briefing by Tierney and Remond, produced as part of a UK in a Changing Europe project.

30th October 2018
post by Stephen Tierney

The Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill, which arrives in the House of Lords today, is set to be enacted by way of fast-track legislative procedure this week.

29th October 2018
post by Greg Davies

In the aftermath of the most recent EU Council meeting, the prospect of the UK’s exit from the European Union without a withdrawal agreement looms larger than ever. Greg Davies suggests that this is a test for intergovernmental relations between Cardiff and Westminster and for the wider territorial constitution.

24th October 2018
post by Michael Keating

The recent introduction of the bill for an Act of Union into the House of Lords is a welcome addition to the debate on the future of Unionism that has been rumbling on since the devolution legislation of 1999 but, says Michael Keating, it contains several problems that will be familiar to those who have followed this debate.

24th October 2018
post by Centre on Const...

Keeping the Irish border open after Brexit is one of the key challenges that the UK and EU negotiation teams currently face.

19th October 2018
post by Michael Keating

Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

16th October 2018
post by Patrick Utz

Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

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Latest blogs

  • 29th November 2018

  • 19th November 2018

    Disagreements between the UK, Welsh and Scottish Governments are about more than inter-party rivalry, says Nicola McEwen, they reflect a very real disagreement about how policy can be made - and by whom.

  • 16th November 2018

    What has been presented as an endgame is really just the beginning of the process and what is being described as the 'transition' or 'implementation' period, says Michael Keating, is really the time in which the real negotiation of what Brexit means will take place.

  • 15th November 2018

    With the politics of the process changing almost by the minute, Richard Parry assesses the ‘stable text’ of the Brexit agreement.

  • 15th November 2018

    As the DUP position shifts and Threatens Theresa May's working majority, Jonathan Evershed assesses the scope and limits of Unionist resistance to the Brexit backstop.

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