Tobias Lock

Tobias Lock's picture
Tobias
Lock
Job Title: 
Lecturer in EU Law
Organisation: 
Edinburgh Law School
Email Address: 
Biography: 
Tobias Lock has been a lecturer in EU Law at Edinburgh Law School since 2013.
 
He is co-director of the Europa Institute and directs the LLM in European Law and LLM in Law programmes.
 
His research interest lies broadly speaking in the EU’s multilevel relations with other legal orders. His main focus is on courts as frontline actors in this plural legal environment. He has published two books on the relations between the European Court of Justice and international courts and has done much work on the relationship between the EU and the European Convention on Human Rights, in particular the EU’s accession to the Convention. 
 
Tobias also works on the application of European law and legal remedies by national courts in different Member States with a particular focus on the UK and Germany. This allows him to combine his interest in comparative law with that in European law. As part of this research he published an article on Member State liability in the national courts and another article addressing the differences in the application of the law on belief discrimination in England and Germany.  His other other research interests include EU constitutional law; (comparative) German constitutional law, and law and religion.

History

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Member for
2 years 3 weeks

Posts by this author:

The hesitant progress of Brexit legislation through Westminster has provided parliament with an opportunity to show its teeth and, says Tobias Lock, it demonstrates that the legislature has bite as well as bark. Cross posted from European Futures - Has Parliament Taken Charge of Brexit? The UK Gover... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit ‘red line’ on a role for the European Court of Justice has been a major source of complication in the early stages of the negotiations, writes Tobias Lock. Analysing the recent UK government negotiating paper on dispute resolution, he argues that its shift in emph... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Following the High Court’s ruling on whether the UK Parliament should be involved in the activation of the Article 50 process to leave the EU, Tobias Lock analyses the judgement. He observes that the UK government will find it difficult to construct an effective case on appeal, and that, should legi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
 Tobias Lock discusses a number of options for Scotland’s European future.   The fact that Scotland voted with 62% for the UK to remain a member of the EU whereas the majority of the overall UK electorate opted to leave the EU, raises important political and legal questions. Scotland’s First Ministe... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
By Tobias Lock, Europa Institute at the University of Edinburgh. Arguments around sovereignty are at the heart of the debate on whether the UK should leave the EU. Those advocating a ‘Leave’ vote on 23 June contend that many laws applicable in Britain are not made by directly elected and fully accou... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

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