Stephen Tierney

Stephen Tierney's picture
Professor
Stephen
Tierney
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Phone Number: 
+44 (0)131-650-2070
Email Address: 
Biography: 

There are significant gaps in the information available to policymakers and citizens at this crucial constitutional moment for Scotland. Stephen Tierney has been engaged in advising the Scottish Parliament on the Referendum Bill, applying his research on international referendum practice to help ensure that the process in 2014 is properly democratic. Through the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law he has also been addressing the substantive issues at stake, including what independence would mean for the constitution of Scotland, and the constitutional process that would likely follow in the event of a Yes vote. Other work has been on the European and International law issues that would need to be addressed were Scotland to become independent. See the paper: Legal Issues Surrounding the Referendum on Independence for Scotland.

A key issue is to help inform the public and in particular young voters. To that end Tierney’s project website offers quizzes aimed at young people, testing their knowledge of the UK and Scottish constitutional systems and, in due course, of the independence issue itself http://www.scottishindependenceaudit.ed.ac.uk/quizzes

Project Job Role: 
Relationships beyond Scotland, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
5 years 6 months

Posts by this author:

This paper addresses Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) in the context of Brexit. Its particular point of focus is the repatriation of competences and the powers of the devolved administrations. A workshop on Justice and Home Affairs in devolved context was held at the University of Edinburgh on Friday... Read more
Post type: Publication
Prof Stephen Tierney and Dr Alexandra Remond Read the full briefing - The Repatriation of Competencies after Brexit: Justice and Home Affairs >> One of the areas of devolved competence that may be affected significantly by Brexit is Justice and Home Affairs (JHA). In this blog post, Professor... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill, which arrives in the House of Lords today, is set to be enacted by way of fast-track legislative procedure this week. The Bill intends to facilitate the formation of an Executive in Northern Ireland while providing for the ex... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. In this post I address a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – whic... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The House of Lords Constitution Committee has today published a comprehensive and critical report on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill (‘the Bill’). The Bill’s second reading will begin in the Lords this week, with the Government committed to bringing forward amendments to the Bill’s provisions r... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In an interim report on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, the House of Lords Constitution Committee has said that the “political, legal and constitutional significance of the Bill is unparalleled”. In this post, Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney examine the main points made in the report and comm... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Posted orginally on the Academy of Government blog >> This post asks: what, if any, impact is a hung Parliament likely to have upon the relatively new House of Commons procedure known as ‘English Votes for English laws (EVEL)’? Will a minority Conservative Government, propped up by the DUP, fi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In this blog Professor Tierney argues that the legality of a unilateral referendum organised by the Scottish Parliament is a grey area. He also offers personal reflections from his experience as a parliamentary adviser at the time of the 2014 referendum and contends that a referendum held without an... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney, University of Edinburgh, discusses how the next two years are set to be consumed by two parallel processes: We will see the UK leave the EU and could also see Scotland leave the UK in an effort to remain within the EU. This post originally appeared on the UK Constitutional Law blog.... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Supreme Court's decision to exclude Holyrood from the decision to trigger Brexit only confirmed what we already knew, says Stephen Tierney - that conventions are not laws. However, the proposed Great Repeal Bill is an entirely different matter.    So Holyrood’s consent is not needed to trigger B... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Pages

Latest blogs

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

  • 24th January 2019

    Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?

Read More Posts