Sionaidh Douglas-Scott

Sionaidh Douglas-Scott's picture
Professor
Sionaidh
Douglas-Scott
Job Title: 
Professor of European and Human Rights Law
Organisation: 
University of Oxford
Biography: 

Professor Douglas-Scott was born and grew up in Edinburgh. She studied philosophy, art history and aesthetics before taking a degree in law. Before coming to Oxford, she was Professor of Law at King's College London. She is a barrister and a member of Gray's Inn.

Sionaidh Douglas-Scott works primarily within the field of EU and public law, human rights and legal and social theory. She is particularly interested in questions of justice and human rights in the EU and Europe more generally, and has published widely in these fields, as well as giving expert evidence to legislatures, and training European judiciary in the human rights field. She is also interested in sub-state independence movements in Europe and has been an active commentator on Scottish and Catalan independence movements in the media.

Professor Douglas-Scott is the author of the monograph, Constitutional Law of the European Union. She and has also published a monograph, Law After Modernity, which was nominated for the Socio-Legal Book prize, and explores at a more abstract level many of the issues of pluralism, justice and human rights also to be found in her work on the EU, and unusually, for a work of legal theory, is illustrated with various images and artistic works. She is also the co-editor of a collection of essays on law and religion, entitled, Faith in Law.

Her current projects include a monograph on European Human Rights law and a co-edited volume on the European Union and Human Rights. She is also a member of a large-scale research project on European citizenship funded by the European Commission with a major research grant, investigating barriers that EU citizens encounter in the exercise of their rights and obligations, for which, with assistance of Joelle Grogan, she completed a report on EU citizenship rights in the UK and Ireland. She is also very interested in visual representations and the law, and the relations of law, art and the image. 

She has held visiting posts and delivered lectures at various institutions in Europe and the US, including Georgetown Law School, Columbia University and the University of Bonn, where she was visiting Jean Monnet Professor. Since 1993, she has co-taught and developed a course on comparative US and European human rights law with Justice Anthony Kennedy of the US Supreme Court at the Salzburg Forum for International Studies

Many of Professor Douglas-Scott's publications may be downloaded from her ssrn webpage at: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=1246246

and also from her academia.edu page: http://oxford.academia.edu/SDouglasScott

Project Job Role: 
European and Human Rights Law

History

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3 years 11 months

Posts by this author:

Sionaidh Douglas-Scott, Oxford University, looks at the impact on the devolved regions, especially on Scotland, of a UK exit from the EU. The Conservative party’s proposal to repeal the Human Rights Act (and their proposal’s many faults) has already been well documented. However, the European Union... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Oxford University's Sionaidh Douglas-Scott weighs in on the debate over EU membership for an independent Scotland. In July 2014, Jean-Claude Juncker was designated as new President of the European Commission. It may be that he will take a more neutral approach to the question of an independent Scotl... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 21st June 2018

    New research conducted by the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow suggests that a post-Brexit Scotland is likely to find itself losing out on much-needed low-skilled migrant labour from the European Economic Area (EEA) to English-speaking countries such as North America, Australia, and to countries within the EEA.

  • 19th June 2018

    Following the collapse of the Rajoy government following a corruption scandal, how does the new political landscape affect the constitutional debate in Catalonia? Prof Antonia María Ruiz Jiménez of Universidad Pablo de Olavide suggests that this apparently dramatic change will make relatively little difference.

  • 13th June 2018

    While populist leaders and movements make headlines worldwide, an often more subtle majority nationalism remains an endemic condition of the modern world. This phenomenon is comparatively understudied. The Centre on Constitutional Change invites calls for abstracts for an international workshop on the topic of majority nationalism, to be held in February 2019.

  • 31st May 2018

    The recent report by the Growth Commission contains some interesting ideas, says Michael Keating, but also makes some problematic assumptions.

  • 30th May 2018

    The Scottish and Welsh Governments worked together closely during their negotiations with the UK Government over those aspects of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill that related to devolution. Despite ultimately choosing different paths, say Hedydd Phylip and Greg Davies, this spirit of cooperation looks set to continue.

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