Sarah Minty

Sarah Minty's picture
Miss
Sarah
Minty
Job Title: 
Research Fellow
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Sarah is currently working with Professor Sheila Riddell on the ESRC project  Higher Education in Scotland, the Devolution Settlement and the Referendum on Independence. Since starting in educational research almost ten years ago, Sarah has worked on numerous projects - at the Universities of Edinburgh and Stirling, and at the Institute for Policy Studies in Education (IPSE) at London Metropolitan University. Her work has covered a range of educational settings, including schools, vocational education, higher education, and supplementary schools.

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
5 years 3 months

Posts by this author:

It’s safe to assume that HE policies in the rest of the UK will continue to have an impact on the future of HE in Scotland, whatever the outcome next week. Sarah Minty of CREID discusses. As we reach the final days of the referendum campaign, amid what is looking like an increasingly close result, i... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This working paper presents findings from research undertaken with young people as part of the ESRC project ‘Higher Education in Scotland, the devolution settlement and the referendum on independence’. Interviews were conducted with 148 young people aged 14 to 19.  The interviews were designed to co... Read more
Post type: Publication
by Sarah Minty, Research Fellow, Centre for Research in Education Inclusion and Diversity (CREID) *There are still a few places left for our seminar: The future of higher education in Scotland and the UK, to be held at National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh on 29 January. Speakers include Michael... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Guest post by Sarah Minty, Research Fellow, Centre for Research in Education, Inclusion and Diversity (CREID), University of Edinburgh One of the fundamental principles underpinning the Scottish education system is the meritocratic idea that, irrespective of social background, all children should ha... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

  • 16th January 2019

    Fellows of the Centre on Constitutional Change respond to the rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement by the House of Commons and the impending no-confidence vote in the government.

  • 11th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses the unfolding drama at Westminster around no-deal scenarios. The deal ‘would be an uncomfortable outcome for the EU: providing quota-fee, tariff-free access to the EU market without any accompanying financial obligations; without any access to UK fishing waters in the absence of further agreement; and without any commitments to align with the majority of so-called level playing field arrangements’. For Tory leavers, what’s not to like in this negotiating triumph for Theresa May?

Read More Posts