Sandra León

Sandra León's picture
Dr
Sandra
León
Job Title: 
Lecturer in Politics
Organisation: 
University of York
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Biography

 
Sandra León graduated from the Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona) with a BA in Politics (1999) before going on to complete an MA in Social Sciences from the Juan March Institute (Madrid, 2002). Funded by 'La Caixa Foundation', between 2003 and 2005 she visited as a PhD student the Department of Government at Harvard University (MA, USA). In June 2006 she defended her Ph.D. thesis on The Political Economy of Fiscal Decentralization at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Her thesis was supervised by José María Maravall at the Juan March Institute.
 
Her doctoral research explored the political motivations of politicians in designing intergovernmental transfers, bridging two different disciplines (public finance and political science) and integrating the analysis of economic and political factors. She won two prizes; both awarded to best PhD dissertations each year and her thesis was published as a book in 2007.
 
Between 2006 and 2011 Sandra worked as a researcher in different Spanish institutions - Escola Galega de Administración Pública (2006-2008) and Centro de Estudios Políticos y Constitutionales (2008-2011). She has taught various aspects of Comparative Government, ranging from and introduction to politics and political democratic theory, to advanced courses on political institutions, both at George Washington University (Madrid Study Centre) and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (2011-2012). In March 2013 she joined the Politics Department at the University of York.

History

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Posts by this author:

As politics in Catalonia becomes increasingly polarised over territorial concerns, finds Sandra León, those parties and policies that don't speak to the issues of sovereignty and relations with Madrid are being squeezed out.  Are elections about winning the centre? Not always. The Catalan election r... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 19th October 2018

    Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

  • 16th October 2018

    Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

  • 15th October 2018

    As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.

  • 13th October 2018

    Theresa May’s efforts to keep her DUP allies onside may, suggests Prof Nicola McEwen, end up easing Nicola Sturgeon’s path to independence following any subsequent referendum on the subject.

  • 12th October 2018

    The Commission on Justice in Wales, chaired by Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, will further clarify the legal and political identity of Wales within the UK constitution. Doing so, explains Prof Dan Wincott, will also bring clarity to the enduring significance of other territorial legal jurisdictions.

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