Sandra León

Sandra León's picture
Dr
Sandra
León
Job Title: 
Lecturer in Politics
Organisation: 
University of York
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Biography

 
Sandra León graduated from the Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona) with a BA in Politics (1999) before going on to complete an MA in Social Sciences from the Juan March Institute (Madrid, 2002). Funded by 'La Caixa Foundation', between 2003 and 2005 she visited as a PhD student the Department of Government at Harvard University (MA, USA). In June 2006 she defended her Ph.D. thesis on The Political Economy of Fiscal Decentralization at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Her thesis was supervised by José María Maravall at the Juan March Institute.
 
Her doctoral research explored the political motivations of politicians in designing intergovernmental transfers, bridging two different disciplines (public finance and political science) and integrating the analysis of economic and political factors. She won two prizes; both awarded to best PhD dissertations each year and her thesis was published as a book in 2007.
 
Between 2006 and 2011 Sandra worked as a researcher in different Spanish institutions - Escola Galega de Administración Pública (2006-2008) and Centro de Estudios Políticos y Constitutionales (2008-2011). She has taught various aspects of Comparative Government, ranging from and introduction to politics and political democratic theory, to advanced courses on political institutions, both at George Washington University (Madrid Study Centre) and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (2011-2012). In March 2013 she joined the Politics Department at the University of York.

History

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Posts by this author:

As politics in Catalonia becomes increasingly polarised over territorial concerns, finds Sandra León, those parties and policies that don't speak to the issues of sovereignty and relations with Madrid are being squeezed out.  Are elections about winning the centre? Not always. The Catalan election r... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 16th August 2018

    A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

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