Richard Parry

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Richard
Parry
Job Title: 
Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 

I joined Social Policy in 1983 after working as a civil servant and as a researcher at the University of Strathclyde. I am a political scientist and my work falls in the interconnected areas of public policy, public administration and public sector resource allocation, especially in Scotland and the UK. Earlier research projects included ones on public employment, central-local relations in Scotland, comparative European social policy and privatisation in social policy.

History

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Member for
5 years 4 days

Posts by this author:

Shorn of the legal language required by the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, the motion agreed by MPs on Tuesday 29 January 2019 states that ‘This House….rejects the United Kingdom leaving the European Union without an Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship, and requir... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979 is writing itself as a sequel to James Graham’s 2012 play This House about events forty years ago. Labour’s Tulip Siddiq, unwell, pregnant, wheelchair-bound, played a cameo role, parked next t... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
  The deal (Withdrawal Agreement)  ‘would be an uncomfortable outcome for the European Union: providing quota-fee, tariff-free access to the EU market without any accompanying financial obligations; without any access to UK fishing waters in the absence of further agreement; and without any commitm... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With the politics of the process changing almost by the minute, Richard Parry assesses the ‘stable text’ of the Brexit agreement.    The final phase of negotiating action in recent days was when the EU27 started to push back against some aspects of the UK-wide solution on Ireland upon realising that... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.  Sometimes in politics setbacks can actually be set-ups, designed to give political propulsion to the outcome that is eventually... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers.  The UK government’s White Paper of 12 July marked the culmination of the government’s negotiation with itself as it picked cherries even more precisely, like... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the interacting policies on devolution and Brexit in the current impasse between UK and devolved governments. As part of their unfolding tactics on Brexit, the Scottish and Welsh Governments have through their legislators taken powers to alter inherited EU-based law in devolv... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry discusses the attempts to express political objectives in secure legal wording as Brexit progresses   On 20 December 2017 the  EU Commission set out its draft supplementary negotiating guidelines for the next phase of the Brexit negotiations, during which the arrangements for UK withdr... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The post-Hogmanay atmosphere is always sobering, and never more than this year when the party may be over for some many people in so many ways. During 2017, three great political experiments - Brexit, the Trump Presidency and the Catalonian independence project - failed to progress beyond the damage... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Richard Parry reflects on the first-stage agreement between the UK and EU that defuses political of tension but has little comfort for the proponents of Brexit and leaves all to play for in the territorial politics of Britain and Ireland.    Sometimes even the best-trailed political events happen su... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 19th February 2019

    Over the course of the UK’s preparations for withdrawing from the EU, the issue of the UK’s own internal market has emerged as an issue of concern, and one that has the potentially significant consequences for devolution. Dr Jo Hunt of Cardiff University examines the implications.

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

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