Peter McGregor

Peter McGregor's picture
Peter
McGregor
Job Title: 
Director of the Strathclyde International Public Policy Institute, Head of Department of Economics
Organisation: 
University of Strathclyde
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Professor Peter McGregor has held visiting academic posts in Sweden and Germany, and has consultancy experience in the Middle and Far East. He has acted as a UNDP-funded consultant to the Economic Planning Unit of the Prime Minister's Department, Malaysia, has been a member of the Bank of England's Panel of Academic Consultants and is currently a Special Researcher to the Development Policy Research Institute, The Hokkaido University, Japan. He has published widely in books and in professional journals, including the European Economic Review, Oxford Economic Papers and the Journal of Regional Science. Current research interests include regional economic modelling and the evaluation of regional economic policies. He was Editor of Regional Studies, the journal of the Regional Studies Association from 1991-1996.

Project Job Role: 
The Economy, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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Member for
4 years 6 months

Posts by this author:

Talk of Scotland adopting a Scandinavian economic model usually comes with no mention of the bill but, suggests recent research, the impact of higher taxes is more complicated than it might at first appear.    The Scottish Government holds up the Scandinavian economic model as one this country might... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Referendum on Scottish independence held on the 18th September, 2014, resulted in a significant majority vote (55% as against 45%) in favour of “no”. Accordingly, Scotland will remain a member of the U.K. for the foreseeable future. However, further changes in the Scottish fiscal system are i... Read more
Post type: Publication
Much of the debate since the referendum has focussed on which additional powers are likely to be devolved from Westminster to Holyrood. Rather less attention has been paid to the likely impact on the Scottish economy of devolving any of the powers that have been suggested. At the time of writing, th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Peter McGregor discusses tax powers for Scotland in the event of a no vote. A “no” vote  in the forthcoming referendum on Scottish Independence would immediately lay to rest one of the most controversial issues that has characterised the economic debate so far, namely the currency issue.  Scotland w... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The final report of the Labour Party’s Devolution Commission, published yesterday, contains two main proposals on taxation. Firstly, that the Scottish Parliament’s powers over income taxation should be enhanced with the ability to: vary income tax rates by up to 15p in the pound, compared to the 10p... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
by Patrizio Lecca, Peter McGregor and Kim Swales, Fraser of Allander Institute, Department of Economics and Strathclyde International Public Policy Institute, University of Strathclyde and Centre for Constitutional Change In tone the White Paper appears to mark a move in the direction of the Scandin... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 23rd June 2018

    The end of Free Movement following Brexit will have a dramatic impact on the ability of all areas of the UK to attract low-skilled labour. Dr Sarah Kyambi considers the impact of the change in Scotland and whether now is the time to devolve immigration policy.

  • 21st June 2018

    New research conducted by the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow suggests that a post-Brexit Scotland is likely to find itself losing out on much-needed low-skilled migrant labour from the European Economic Area (EEA) to English-speaking countries such as North America, Australia, and to countries within the EEA.

  • 19th June 2018

    Following the collapse of the Rajoy government following a corruption scandal, how does the new political landscape affect the constitutional debate in Catalonia? Prof Antonia María Ruiz Jiménez of Universidad Pablo de Olavide suggests that this apparently dramatic change will make relatively little difference.

  • 13th June 2018

    While populist leaders and movements make headlines worldwide, an often more subtle majority nationalism remains an endemic condition of the modern world. This phenomenon is comparatively understudied. The Centre on Constitutional Change invites calls for abstracts for an international workshop on the topic of majority nationalism, to be held in February 2019.

  • 31st May 2018

    The recent report by the Growth Commission contains some interesting ideas, says Michael Keating, but also makes some problematic assumptions.

Read More Posts