Peter McGregor

Peter McGregor's picture
Peter
McGregor
Job Title: 
Director of the Strathclyde International Public Policy Institute, Head of Department of Economics
Organisation: 
University of Strathclyde
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Professor Peter McGregor has held visiting academic posts in Sweden and Germany, and has consultancy experience in the Middle and Far East. He has acted as a UNDP-funded consultant to the Economic Planning Unit of the Prime Minister's Department, Malaysia, has been a member of the Bank of England's Panel of Academic Consultants and is currently a Special Researcher to the Development Policy Research Institute, The Hokkaido University, Japan. He has published widely in books and in professional journals, including the European Economic Review, Oxford Economic Papers and the Journal of Regional Science. Current research interests include regional economic modelling and the evaluation of regional economic policies. He was Editor of Regional Studies, the journal of the Regional Studies Association from 1991-1996.

Project Job Role: 
The Economy, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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Posts by this author:

Talk of Scotland adopting a Scandinavian economic model usually comes with no mention of the bill but, suggests recent research, the impact of higher taxes is more complicated than it might at first appear.    The Scottish Government holds up the Scandinavian economic model as one this country might... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Referendum on Scottish independence held on the 18th September, 2014, resulted in a significant majority vote (55% as against 45%) in favour of “no”. Accordingly, Scotland will remain a member of the U.K. for the foreseeable future. However, further changes in the Scottish fiscal system are i... Read more
Post type: Publication
Much of the debate since the referendum has focussed on which additional powers are likely to be devolved from Westminster to Holyrood. Rather less attention has been paid to the likely impact on the Scottish economy of devolving any of the powers that have been suggested. At the time of writing, th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Peter McGregor discusses tax powers for Scotland in the event of a no vote. A “no” vote  in the forthcoming referendum on Scottish Independence would immediately lay to rest one of the most controversial issues that has characterised the economic debate so far, namely the currency issue.  Scotland w... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The final report of the Labour Party’s Devolution Commission, published yesterday, contains two main proposals on taxation. Firstly, that the Scottish Parliament’s powers over income taxation should be enhanced with the ability to: vary income tax rates by up to 15p in the pound, compared to the 10p... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
by Patrizio Lecca, Peter McGregor and Kim Swales, Fraser of Allander Institute, Department of Economics and Strathclyde International Public Policy Institute, University of Strathclyde and Centre for Constitutional Change In tone the White Paper appears to mark a move in the direction of the Scandin... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

  • 16th January 2019

    Fellows of the Centre on Constitutional Change respond to the rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement by the House of Commons and the impending no-confidence vote in the government.

  • 11th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses the unfolding drama at Westminster around no-deal scenarios. The deal ‘would be an uncomfortable outcome for the EU: providing quota-fee, tariff-free access to the EU market without any accompanying financial obligations; without any access to UK fishing waters in the absence of further agreement; and without any commitments to align with the majority of so-called level playing field arrangements’. For Tory leavers, what’s not to like in this negotiating triumph for Theresa May?

Read More Posts