Nicola McEwen

Nicola McEwen's picture
Professor
Nicola
McEwen
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Phone Number: 
+44 (0)131 651 1831
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Nicola McEwen is a Professor of Politics at the University of Edinburgh, and Associate Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change (CCC). She was appointed ESRC Senior Scotland Fellow, exploring Scotland’s external and intergovernmental relations in the event of independence. This external dimension to the future of Scotland remains the focus of her research within the SCCC. A political scientist at Edinburgh since 2001, Nicola specialises in research on devolution, territorial politics and multi-level governance. Within these broad fields, her research has examined: nationalism and territorial politics; intergovernmental relations; public policy (especially social welfare and energy policy); parties and elections; and voting behaviour.

Her focus is primarily on Scotland, but often also addresses developments in similar ‘sub-state nations’, including Quebec, Catalonia, the Basque Country and Flanders. Nicola is also Associate Director of Research at Edinburgh’s School of Social and Political Science, and Managing Editor of the journal, Regional and Federal Studies, the leading European journal in the field of territorial politics.

She is a frequent contributor to radio, television and print news outlets, offering commentary on elections, government and policy, and the Scottish constitutional debate. Recent publications can be found at:

http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/research/mcewen_nicola

Project Job Role: 
Co-Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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Member for
4 years 11 months

Posts by this author:

The proposals within the Scotland Bill - as well as the associated fiscal framework currently being worked out by the UK and Scottish Governments - represent big changes to Scotland’s political system, says Nicola McEwen. However, has enough room been left for the public at the negotiating table?   ... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The influence of the SNP at Westminster is yet to be truly measured, says Nicola McEwen, but the Scotland Bill may demonstrate that real change is achieved behind the scenes.    It was 27 years ago when the Jim Sillars, flush from winning the Govan by-election for the SNP, taunted Scottish Labour MP... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the House of Commons prepares to debate the welfare clauses in the Scotland Bill, Professor Nicola McEwen reflects on some of the challenges and opportunities the new welfare powers may present.   The Scotland Bill, once implemented, will represent a marked increase in the Scottish Parliament’s r... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Whereas Scottish Parliamentary elections give a platform to Scotland-centred issues, Westminster General Elections in Scotland are usually very British affairs. Especially since devolution in 1999, UK elections have been dominated by the contest for Prime Minister and the party of British government... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
There is more to devolution than powers being controlled by the sub-state parliaments, says Nicola McEwen. Effective processes for collective decision making at the level of the state should also be considered.This post is co-published with Holyrood Magazine.   Evaluating claims that Scotland will h... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Devolution (Further Powers) Committee, 11 December 2014 - Evidence from Professor Nicola McEwen, ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change, University of Edinburgh This paper outlines some of the issues that may emerge from the recommendations of the Smith Commission on the devolution and administration... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The devolution of welfare provision has featured large in the public debate leading up to the publication of the Smith Commission's report. Many in civic Scotland had pushed for a significant form of welfare devolution. They are likely to be disappointed says Nicola McEwen. The recommendations of th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Smith Commission seems set to include some welfare devolution in the Heads of Agreement to be announced on Thursday. But what does welfare devolution mean in practice? Professor Nicola McEwen argues that there are a variety of models of welfare devolution, each with different implications for th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Opinion polls have consistently suggested strong support for the Scottish parliament to have powers over social security. Over the next 6 weeks, the Smith commission now has an opportunity to consider, as part of its broader process, whether agreement can be reached over welfare devolution. The UK p... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Nicola McEwen discusses that when the UK government gave its consent to the Scottish government’s plan to hold a referendum, it was on the basis that the referendum would be ‘legal, fair and decisive’. This article is taken from the latest issue of Discover Society. The Edinburgh agreement – the int... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 20th July 2018

    Richard Parry reviews a fast-evolving situation as the march of time and need to reconcile rhetoric and practicality constrain policy-makers

  • 13th July 2018

    The White Paper published this week talks about the UK Government making ‘sovereign decisions’ to adopt European rules but, as we know from the experience of Norway and Switzerland, this can be an illusory sovereignty when the costs of deviating from the rules is exclusion from the single market or European programmes. CCC Director Professor Michael Keating looks at whether the UK is ready for this kind of deal.

  • 12th July 2018

    Last week the government released its fisheries white paper. While most of the fisheries and Brexit debate centres on quotas and access to waters, there is also an important devolution dimension. Brexit already has profound consequences for the UK’s devolution settlement and fisheries policy is one example of this. So, in addition to communicating its overall vision for post-Brexit fisheries policy, the white paper was also an opportunity for the government to set out how it would see that policy working in the devolved UK.

  • 4th July 2018

    At the same time as Parliament prepares to ‘take back control’ from Brussels, the executive is in fact accruing to itself further control over the legislative process. CCC Fellow Professor Stephen Tierney addresses a number of trends – only some of which are a direct consequence of the unique circumstances of Brexit – which suggest a deeper realignment of institutional power within the constitution and a consequent diminution of Parliament’s legislative power.

  • 27th June 2018

    Faced with a choice between splitting her Cabinet into winners and losers, Theresa May has sought to keep the Brexit crap game going. She does this by avoiding betting on either a hard or soft Brexit. Professor Richard Rose of Strathclyde looks at the high stakes outcomes facing the Prime Minister. .

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