Michael Keating

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Professor
Michael
Keating
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics, University of Aberdeen and Director of ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Phone Number: 
+44 (0) 7758 329 876
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, part-time Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. He has taught in several universities including Strathclyde, Western Ontario and the European University Institute, as well as universities in Spain and France.  He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Social Sciences. Michael Keating is the author or editor of over thirty books on Scottish politics, European politics, nationalism and regionalism. Among his recent books are The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Project Job Role: 
Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

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4 years 11 months

Posts by this author:

Twenty five years ago, the historian Eric Hobsbawm announced the end of nations and nationalism. Like the Owl of Minerva, they appeared in view only as they flew into the twilight. In 2015, however, nationalism looks very much alive, with restive movements even in established states like the United... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
David Cameron may well find that his proposals are not enough for Eurosceptic Tories while at the same time being too much for his EU partners and many voters inclined to remain, says Michael Keating.     David Cameron’s four demands outlined in the letter to the European Council will not satisfy hi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the light of the Catalan results both Madrid and Barcelona have some options, says Michael Keating, but the current political climate is unlikely to see an immediate breakthrough. The September elections in Catalonia were called in order to try and resolve the independence issue. Unable to stage... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Since the independence referendum a year ago, unionists have been trying to find a way to define what it is and a core and purpose of 'Britishness'. If they continue in this vein, says Michael Keating, they run the risk of destroying the very thing they are trying to save.    In the wake of the near... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Some time in the next two years, Scots will face another referendum, on whether the United Kingdom should remain in the European Union. This issue has become deeply entangled with the question of Scotland’s place in the United Kingdom. Last year’s referendum was about independence-in-Europe and sinc... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The introduction of English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) faces a problem, says Michael Keating, in that only a minority of English voters will ever have supported the laws in question.    The government has now come up with its answer to the West Lothian Question, that Scottish MPs can vote on Engl... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The new government has thrown open the European questions but, asks Michael Keating, what - if any - answers might prove satisfactory? Now that the Conservatives have a majority government, we will have a referendum on membership of the European Union. This is scheduled to happen before the end of 2... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
It is a peculiar feature of devolution in the United Kingdom that each nation is treated differently, with its own settlement geared to local political demands.   Foreign observers look with puzzlement, seeing it as British pragmatism taken to extremes.   Yet, whether by chance or design, devolution... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Public Administration Committee’s new report on the referendum focuses on two issues: the role of the civil service in helping to produce the Scottish Government’s independence white paper; and the action of Treasury Permanent Secretary Nicholas MacPherson in making public his advice that a curr... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Michael Keating discusses how English votes for English Laws has come to occupy a huge place in the debate about further devolution. English votes for English Laws has come to occupy a huge place in the debate about further devolution. For many Conservatives, it is a matter of elementary justice tha... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 21st June 2018

    New research conducted by the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow suggests that a post-Brexit Scotland is likely to find itself losing out on much-needed low-skilled migrant labour from the European Economic Area (EEA) to English-speaking countries such as North America, Australia, and to countries within the EEA.

  • 19th June 2018

    Following the collapse of the Rajoy government following a corruption scandal, how does the new political landscape affect the constitutional debate in Catalonia? Prof Antonia María Ruiz Jiménez of Universidad Pablo de Olavide suggests that this apparently dramatic change will make relatively little difference.

  • 13th June 2018

    While populist leaders and movements make headlines worldwide, an often more subtle majority nationalism remains an endemic condition of the modern world. This phenomenon is comparatively understudied. The Centre on Constitutional Change invites calls for abstracts for an international workshop on the topic of majority nationalism, to be held in February 2019.

  • 31st May 2018

    The recent report by the Growth Commission contains some interesting ideas, says Michael Keating, but also makes some problematic assumptions.

  • 30th May 2018

    The Scottish and Welsh Governments worked together closely during their negotiations with the UK Government over those aspects of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill that related to devolution. Despite ultimately choosing different paths, say Hedydd Phylip and Greg Davies, this spirit of cooperation looks set to continue.

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