Michael Keating

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Professor
Michael
Keating
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics, University of Aberdeen and Director of ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Phone Number: 
+44 (0) 7758 329 876
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, part-time Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. He has taught in several universities including Strathclyde, Western Ontario and the European University Institute, as well as universities in Spain and France.  He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Social Sciences. Michael Keating is the author or editor of over thirty books on Scottish politics, European politics, nationalism and regionalism. Among his recent books are The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Project Job Role: 
Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

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At one time, Scottish politics, like those elsewhere in Great Britain, divided rather clearly on the left-right axis, with elections disputed between Labour and the Conservatives. In the mid-twentieth century, they divided the vote fairly evenly between them. Since the 1970s, another axis has become... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
After twenty years of reform, says Michael Keating, the UK constitution is back where it started.    The British constitution is often praised for its flexibility and capacity to adapt. On the other hand, critics have consistently complained that it gives too much power to the executive and lacks ch... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
That the EU has placed Gibraltar on the agenda for Brexit negotiations should come as no surprise, says Michael Keating, as the issue, which had already been indicated, remains a sensitive one in Spain.    The UK Government and media seem to have been taken aback by the decision of the EU to introdu... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The repatriation of powers from the EU to the UK and devolved governments is neither straightforward nor, as yet, resolved. Prof Michael Keating examines some of the issues that will play out in terms of determining whether powers from Brussels will default to London on one hand, or Edinburgh, Cardi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
How can Scotland become a wealthier and fairer (and also healthier, safer, stronger, smarter and greener) country using the powers now devolved to the Scottish Parliament. Michael Keating outlines his most recent book, a collection of essays by CCC fellows on the political economy of constitutional... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May taking apparently incompatible positions over a second independence referendum, Michael Keating considers whether the constitution is now at breaking point.  The UK Government’s decision appears to be final. A Scottish independence referendum is not ruled out in... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Brexit poses a considerable challenge to both sides in the Scottish indeopendence debate, says Michael Keating, as the demand to take back sovereignty requires us to say where it comes back to; London or Edinburgh.   The independence referendum of 2014 divided Scotland into two camps, a division tha... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Michaell Keating discusses how we are still a long way from federalism but closer to a constitutional clash as further Brexit legislation looms. This article appeard in The Herald. The devolution settlements of 1999 were a way of squaring a circle. On the one hand, they gave the non-English parts of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In 2014 Scots voted to remain in the United Kingdom by 55 per cent. This year they voted 62 per cent to remain in the European Union. With the UK now heading for Brexit, they cannot have both. Michael Keating discusses what happens next. This article originally appeared in The Herald. IN 2014 Scots... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK Government may well have overplayed its hand in the case recently heard by the Supreme Court, explains Michael Keating.   It is well known that the United Kingdom does not have a codified, written constitution, to which reference can be made when matters of constitutional law are in question.... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 19th October 2018

    Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

  • 16th October 2018

    Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

  • 15th October 2018

    As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.

  • 13th October 2018

    Theresa May’s efforts to keep her DUP allies onside may, suggests Prof Nicola McEwen, end up easing Nicola Sturgeon’s path to independence following any subsequent referendum on the subject.

  • 12th October 2018

    The Commission on Justice in Wales, chaired by Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, will further clarify the legal and political identity of Wales within the UK constitution. Doing so, explains Prof Dan Wincott, will also bring clarity to the enduring significance of other territorial legal jurisdictions.

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