Michael Keating

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Professor
Michael
Keating
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics, University of Aberdeen and Director of ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Phone Number: 
+44 (0) 7758 329 876
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, part-time Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. He has taught in several universities including Strathclyde, Western Ontario and the European University Institute, as well as universities in Spain and France.  He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Social Sciences. Michael Keating is the author or editor of over thirty books on Scottish politics, European politics, nationalism and regionalism. Among his recent books are The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Project Job Role: 
Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

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Posts by this author:

Neither the Spanish nor Catalan government's have the mandate or the room for manoeuvre that would allow them to break the current impasse, says Michael Keating.    Catalans’ views on the proposed independence referendum differ. Some are completely in favour and will vote Yes. Others believe that Ca... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Decisions over the repatriation of powers and the role of a 'UK single Market' will have significant implications for the future of devolution and the nature of the UK as a state, says Michael Keating.  The devolution statutes for Scotland and Wales of the late 1990s were more permissive than those... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
M. Keating, G. Laforest (Eds.) - Constitutional Politics and the Territorial Question in Canada and the United Kingdom Federalism and Devolution Compared Series: Comparative Territorial Politics Contributes to our understanding of constitutional and political developments taking place in Canada and... Read more
Post type: Publication
Michael Keating remembers his friend and colleague Prof Bob Young who has passed away. Prof Young was a member of the Centre's advisory board and a tireless supporter of our work.  It is with profound sadness that we note the death of Professor Robert Young of the University of Western Ontario. Bob... Read more
Post type: News Article
It will be difficult for the Isle of Man to resolve its post-Brexit relationship with the EU, says Prof Michael Keating, until Britain's position is clearer.    Brexit has shed light on parts of the constitutional arrangement across these islands that normally receive little attention. Issues that h... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Michael Keating considers the EU Withdrawal bill and explains that it has sizable implications for the future of devolution and the UK constitution more generally.    One of the many contentious details of Brexit is what will happen to those competences that are currently both devolved to Scotland,... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
What will happen in Catalonia on October 1? Something, for sure, says Michael Keating, but it's really not clear what that will be.    Something will happen in Catalonia on 1 October but nobody knows quite what. This is the date chosen by the Catalan government for a referendum on independence from... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Theresa May called the snap election hoping for a strong majority, to give her a free hand to deal with the EU. While promising a ‘UK approach’ to Brexit, the Conservatives rejected different arrangements for the UK’s component nations or anything more than a consultative role for the devolved gover... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
At one time, Scottish politics, like those elsewhere in Great Britain, divided rather clearly on the left-right axis, with elections disputed between Labour and the Conservatives. In the mid-twentieth century, they divided the vote fairly evenly between them. Since the 1970s, another axis has become... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
After twenty years of reform, says Michael Keating, the UK constitution is back where it started.    The British constitution is often praised for its flexibility and capacity to adapt. On the other hand, critics have consistently complained that it gives too much power to the executive and lacks ch... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 16th August 2018

    A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

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