Michael Keating's blog

What will happen in Catalonia on October 1? Something, for sure, says Michael Keating, but it's really not clear what that will be. 
 
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Theresa May called the snap election hoping for a strong majority, to give her a free hand to deal with the EU. While promising a ‘UK approach’ to Brexit, the Conservatives rejected different arrangements for the UK’s component nations or anything more than a consultative role for the devolved governments. Following the General Election, this may have to change.

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At one time, Scottish politics, like those elsewhere in Great Britain, divided rather clearly on the left-right axis, with elections disputed between Labour and the Conservatives. In the mid-twentieth century, they divided the vote fairly evenly between them. Since the 1970s, another axis has become significant, the unionist-nationalist divide. Now there is an additional one, on Europe, between Remain and Leave supporters. The old party system has broken down, creating instability and marked shifts in support from one election to the next.
 
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After twenty years of reform, says Michael Keating, the UK constitution is back where it started. 
 
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That the EU has placed Gibraltar on the agenda for Brexit negotiations should come as no surprise, says Michael Keating, as the issue, which had already been indicated, remains a sensitive one in Spain. 
 
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The repatriation of powers from the EU to the UK and devolved governments is neither straightforward nor, as yet, resolved. Prof Michael Keating examines some of the issues that will play out in terms of determining whether powers from Brussels will default to London on one hand, or Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast on the other.
 
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With Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May taking apparently incompatible positions over a second independence referendum, Michael Keating considers whether the constitution is now at breaking point. 

The UK Government’s decision appears to be final. A Scottish independence referendum is not ruled out in principle but it is off the table until after Brexit. This is understandable from the UK perspective. The Government has no desire to conduct a war on two fronts or to weaken the UK position in negotiations with the EU. 

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What will happen in Catalonia on October 1? Something, for sure, says Michael Keating, but it's really not clear what that will be.    Something will happen in Catalonia on 1 October but nobody knows quite what. This is the date chosen by the Catalan government for a referendum on independence from... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Theresa May called the snap election hoping for a strong majority, to give her a free hand to deal with the EU. While promising a ‘UK approach’ to Brexit, the Conservatives rejected different arrangements for the UK’s component nations or anything more than a consultative role for the devolved gover... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
At one time, Scottish politics, like those elsewhere in Great Britain, divided rather clearly on the left-right axis, with elections disputed between Labour and the Conservatives. In the mid-twentieth century, they divided the vote fairly evenly between them. Since the 1970s, another axis has become... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
After twenty years of reform, says Michael Keating, the UK constitution is back where it started.    The British constitution is often praised for its flexibility and capacity to adapt. On the other hand, critics have consistently complained that it gives too much power to the executive and lacks ch... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
That the EU has placed Gibraltar on the agenda for Brexit negotiations should come as no surprise, says Michael Keating, as the issue, which had already been indicated, remains a sensitive one in Spain.    The UK Government and media seem to have been taken aback by the decision of the EU to introdu... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The repatriation of powers from the EU to the UK and devolved governments is neither straightforward nor, as yet, resolved. Prof Michael Keating examines some of the issues that will play out in terms of determining whether powers from Brussels will default to London on one hand, or Edinburgh, Cardi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
How can Scotland become a wealthier and fairer (and also healthier, safer, stronger, smarter and greener) country using the powers now devolved to the Scottish Parliament. Michael Keating outlines his most recent book, a collection of essays by CCC fellows on the political economy of constitutional... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May taking apparently incompatible positions over a second independence referendum, Michael Keating considers whether the constitution is now at breaking point.  The UK Government’s decision appears to be final. A Scottish independence referendum is not ruled out in... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Brexit poses a considerable challenge to both sides in the Scottish indeopendence debate, says Michael Keating, as the demand to take back sovereignty requires us to say where it comes back to; London or Edinburgh.   The independence referendum of 2014 divided Scotland into two camps, a division tha... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Michaell Keating discusses how we are still a long way from federalism but closer to a constitutional clash as further Brexit legislation looms. This article appeard in The Herald. The devolution settlements of 1999 were a way of squaring a circle. On the one hand, they gave the non-English parts of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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