Michael Keating

Michael Keating's picture
Professor
Michael
Keating
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics, University of Aberdeen and Director of ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change
Organisation: 
University of Aberdeen
Phone Number: 
+44 (0) 7758 329 876
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, part-time Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. He has taught in several universities including Strathclyde, Western Ontario and the European University Institute, as well as universities in Spain and France.  He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Social Sciences. Michael Keating is the author or editor of over thirty books on Scottish politics, European politics, nationalism and regionalism. Among his recent books are The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Project Job Role: 
Director, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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5 years 7 months

Posts by this author:

  The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to t... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Revised Research Briefing;  The Repatriation of Competences in Agriculture after Brexit   The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’... Read more
Post type: Publication
Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.  Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop. The backstop is supposed to be temporary a arrangement to keep the Irish border open. The UK would remain within the customs union and Northern I... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The path to Brexit has once again been blocked, seemingly on the issue of the Irish border and the implications for the peace process launched by the Good Friday Agreement (GFA). The GFA, while ending the violence of the Troubles, has not been a complete success. Political and social relations betwe... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
What has been presented as an endgame is really just the beginning of the process and what is being described as the 'transition' or 'implementation' period, says Michael Keating, is really the time in which the real negotiation of what Brexit means will take place.  The Brexit process started in Ma... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
A sbumission from Prof. Michael Keating to the Common Frameworks inquiry. The Finance and Constitution Committee recognised in its interim report on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill that “significant further work is required in relation to the scrutiny of developing and agreeing common frameworks” and “that... Read more
Post type: Publication
The recent introduction of the bill for an Act of Union into the House of Lords is a welcome addition to the debate on the future of Unionism that has been rumbling on since the devolution legislation of 1999 but, says Michael Keating, it contains several problems that will be familiar to those who... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.  The Basque Count... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Buried within the UK Agriculture Bill, a clause allowing UK ministers to determine which of three WTO 'boxes' state aid for farmers should goes into could prove difficult for the devolved administrations.     On 10 October the long-awaited Agriculture Bill will be debated in Parliament. It confirms... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Because of leaks coming out of the UK Government, we have known for some time what the broad lines of their negotiating offer to the EU would be. Yet the White Paper is still striking for the depth, breadth and detail about the UK’s future dependence on the European Union. It covers almost everythin... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

  • 24th January 2019

    Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?

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