Meg Russell

Meg Russell's picture
Professor
Meg
Russell
Job Title: 
Professor of Politics & Deputy Director of the Constitution Unit
Organisation: 
University College London
Email Address: 
Biography: 
Meg Russell been based at the Constitution Unit, University College London, since August 1998. She began as a Senior Research Fellow, and became Deputy Director in 2008. She is largely responsible for the Unit's research work on parliament. She is particularly known for her work on comparative bicameralism and the British House of Lords, but has also researched various aspects of the House of Commons and Commons reform. In the past she has also written on political party organisation, candidate selection and women's representation in politics.
 
Beyond academia, Meg has served as a consultant to the Royal Commission on Reform of the House of Lords and, from 2001-2003, was seconded as a full time adviser to Robin Cook in his role as Leader of the House of Commons. She was an adviser to the Arbuthnott Commission on boundaries and voting systems in Scotland, the House of Lords Appointments Commission and the Select Committee on Reform of the House of Commons (the "Wright Committee"). She has frequently given evidence to parliamentary committees, both in Britain and overseas.
 
Project Job Role: 
Constitution Unit

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Posts by this author:

This post has an eye-catching title, but it isn’t a joke – my question is deadly serious. David Cameron’s recent appointment of 45 new peers to the House of Lords has attracted predictable wails of outrage – from the media, from opposition parties, and indeed from myself. His Lords appointments in t... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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