Mary C. Murphy

Mary C. Murphy's picture
Dr
Mary C.
Murphy
Job Title: 
Lecturer, Department of Government
Organisation: 
University College Cork
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Dr Mary C. Murphy is a lecturer in politics with the Department of Government, University College Cork. 

Mary specialises in the study of the EU and Northern Ireland politics. Her monograph Northern Ireland and the European Union: The Dynamics of a Changing Relationship was published by Manchester University Press in April 2014. She was also co-editor of a special issue of Administration in 2014 - 'Reflections on Forty Years of Irish Membership of the EU' - with John O'Brennan (NUIM). In 2015, Mary was awarded a Fulbright-Schuman Fellowship and was based at George Mason University, Virginia. She was also recently awarded a prestigious Jean Monnet Chair in European Integration by the European Commission. 

Mary's secondary research interest is in first-time TDs and processes of parliamentary socialisation. In July 2013, her report At Home in the New House? A Study of First-Time TDs was published by the Hansard Society and launched in Leinster House by the Ceann Comhairle, Seán Barrett TD, and the Chief Whip, Paul Kehoe TD. Mary has also conducted research on MPs in Myanmar/Burma with the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU). In late 2014, Mary was appointed to the Seanad Reform Working Group by An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny.

History

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Posts by this author:

For Ireland, the Brexit discussion has focused heavily on the Irish issue. This has meant an unrelenting emphasis on securing a Brexit deal which ensures no border on the island of Ireland, and achieving a backstop provision which guarantees this scenario. The expectation is that this will be achie... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northn Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.   Northern Ireland, some 56% voted to remain in the EU in June 2... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The implications of Brexit for Northern Ireland are profound, given its history and geographical position as a land border with the European Union. Four decades of sectarian violence have been replaced by a period of sustained peace, economic growth and development, yet the trenchant political divid... Read more
Post type: Publication
Mary C. Murphy, University College Cork, urges caution in linking Northern Ireland support for remaining in the EU with growing support for a united Ireland. In 1998, the Northern Ireland electorate voted in a historic referendum to support the Good Friday/Belfast Agreement. The Agreement was reache... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Latest blogs

  • 19th October 2018

    Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

  • 16th October 2018

    Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

  • 15th October 2018

    As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.

  • 13th October 2018

    Theresa May’s efforts to keep her DUP allies onside may, suggests Prof Nicola McEwen, end up easing Nicola Sturgeon’s path to independence following any subsequent referendum on the subject.

  • 12th October 2018

    The Commission on Justice in Wales, chaired by Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, will further clarify the legal and political identity of Wales within the UK constitution. Doing so, explains Prof Dan Wincott, will also bring clarity to the enduring significance of other territorial legal jurisdictions.

Read More Posts