Mark Shephard

Mark Shephard's picture
Dr
Mark
Shephard
Job Title: 
Senior Lecturer
Organisation: 
University of Strathclyde
Biography: 

Research includes: views on independence and nationalities; effects of social media on young people; whether social media has deliberative qualities; legislative impact on governments; youth parliaments; and image and voting behaviour. My most recent research on social media has been used to develop teaching guides and exercises for the classroom and has also been disseminated via a Political Studies Association youth politics publication, as well as having been adapted for a worldwide audience in a 2014 Tedx talk on Youtube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-YUVP7G524).

Project Job Role: 
Social media and the indyref

History

Blog
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Member for
5 years 2 months

Posts by this author:

In a blog originally published at What Scotland Thinks, Mark Shephard and Stephen Quinlan discuss the latest social media debate. Since our last contribution to this site both the online and offline campaigns have been in full swing. Offline there has been door-to-door canvassing, leafleting, parade... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Mark Shephard, University of Strathclyde suggests that Federalism could save the Union, but then again, so might independence… This post originally appeared on the British Politics Group Blog The Yes campaign have wanted it more, been more organised and visible, and have offered more positives and h... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This blog originally appeared on British Politics Group Blog On Sunday 4th May 2014, The Sunday Herald publicly backed the ‘Yes’ campaign on its front page stating “Sunday Herald says Yes”. The BBC published an online news story on this announcement and opened this up to online comments.The second h... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the independence referendum nears, and arguably as tensions rise, it is important that we engage with media critically and continue to communicate with one another with civility and respect. Building on our (Shephard, Quinlan, Paterson and Tagg) research of social media platforms of the Scottish... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a post recently published on Discover Society, Mark Shephard and Stephen Quinlan of the University of Strathclyde analyse the social media engagement of the Yes Scotland and Better Together campaigns. In 2012, 33 million British people accessed the Internet every day, more than double the number... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This blog originally appeared on What Scotland Thinks So far as the polls are concerned the ‘no’ side are clearly ahead in the referendum race. But are they also ahead when it comes to engaging with their supporters?  After all the enthusiasm of some nationalists for letting their views be known vi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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