Kirstein Rummery

Kirstein Rummery's picture
Kirstein
Rummery
Job Title: 
Professor of Social Policy
Organisation: 
University of Stirling
Biography: 

I joined the University of Stirling in 2007, having previously worked at the universities of Manchester, Birmingham and Kent. I have carried out funded research for the Department of Health and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, and prior to that I even had a stint in the 'real world' as a residential social worker. My research interests lie in three broad areas. Firstly, I have written about welfare partnerships and governance, particularly those involving health and social care services, and I am particularly interested in the implications of these arrangements for citizens. Secondly, I am interested in issues concerning citizenship, social participation and access to services, particularly for disabled and older people. My final area of research concerns gender, particularly the way in which welfare policies affect older and disabled women. I am an active member of the Social Policy Association, serving on the Executive Committee (see www.social-policy.com for details of how to join the SPA), I sit on the editorial boards of Social Policy and Administration and Policy and Politics and am the outgoing editor of Social Policy Review. I am a board member of Engender, a Scottish feminist organisation interested in women's political and social inclusion, www.engender.org.uk, as well as a member of the Scottish Women's Budget Group. I am a keen cook and choral singer and sing in Stirling University's choir www.stirlinguniversitychoir.com. I am currently supervising several PhD students looking at issues of social care, gender and citizenship, but am always interested in applications from potential PhD students interested in social citizenship, disability, age, gender, care, access to services, and welfare governance.
 

Project Job Role: 
Policy Challenges and the Future of Scotland, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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Member for
5 years 4 months

Posts by this author:

Kirstein Rummery explains that the key to the outcome (as indeed to the independence referendum in 2014) seems to be people’s attitude to risk. So, the decision to take a fight that was never really finished in the Eton tuck shop about the leadership of the Conservative party out onto the streets of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
On the face of it, the results of the Scottish Parliament elections on May 5th 2016 do not look promising for gender equality. Overall women now form 35% of Holyrood, exaqctly the same as in 2011, still down from the 2003 high of 40% but the shift to minority government offers some hope for progress... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Politically, Scotland looks promising with regards to gender equality. One of Nicola Sturgeon’s first acts as First Minister was to announce a 50/50 gender equal cabinet, and to stay characteristically calm and dismissive in the face of criticism. This sent an important symbolic message about her st... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
A camel, so the saying goes, is a horse designed by a committee. This week’s publication of The Future Delivery of Social Security in Scotland, the report by the Scottish Welfare Reform Committee, would seem to support that idea. The committee took written evidence from 98 individuals and organisati... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This article originally appeared in The Herald Although, overall, women were slightly less likely to vote Yes than men in the independence referendum, the upswing in voter turnout and in support for the Yes campaign was due in no small part to grassroots women’s organisations campaigning for indepen... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The devolution of welfare benefits to Scotland, especially those relating to disabled people and carers, provides an opportunity to transform the way Scotland approaches welfare and care policy says Kirstein Rummery.  Scotland has long maintained that a sense of social justice and fairness is woven... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Scotland's much-vaunted belief that it is fairer than the rest of the UK is under the spotlight, says Kirstein Rummery, as new powers reopen old questions about the best way to support disabled people.  With the devolution of further powers under the forthcoming Scotland Bill, there is an opportunit... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Achieving economic growth, social justice and tackling inequality: Kirstein Rummery and her team have been researching what Scotland can learn about childcare and long-term care and its effect on gender equality from international evidence?   The Fairer Caring Nations project has been looking at cou... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With polls predicting that this will be the closest election in recent history, and that many voters still undecided, Kirstein Rummery discusses how women and disabled people could make a significant difference. This post appeared in today's edition of The National. More than nine million eligible... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Kirstein Rummery explains how it's curious that the political parties are not making more of an effort to reach out to the 11m disabled adults and 6m carers eligible to vote. An edited version of this article appeared on The Conversation. This week saw the launch of the UK party manifestos, as they... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 12th February 2019

    CCC Fellow Professor Daniel Wincott of Cardiff University examines how Brexit processes have already reshaped territorial politics in the UK and changed its territorial constitution.

  • 7th February 2019

    The future of agriculture policy across the United Kingdom after Brexit is uncertain and risky, according to a new paper by Professor Michael Keating of the Centre on Constitutional Change. Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy over recent years have shifted the emphasis from farming to the broader concept of rural policy. As member states have gained more discretion in applying policy, the nations of the UK have also diverged, according to local conditions and preferences.

  • 4th February 2019

    In our latest report for the "Repatriation of Competences: Implications for Devolution" project, Professor Nicola McEwen and Dr Alexandra Remond examine how, in the longer term, Brexit poses significant risks for the climate and energy ambitions of the devolved nations. These include the loss of European Structural and Investment Funds targeted at climate and low carbon energy policies, from which the devolved territories have benefited disproportionately. European Investment Bank loan funding, which has financed high risk renewables projects, especially in Scotland, may also no longer be as accessible, while future access to research and innovation funding remains uncertain. The removal of the EU policy framework, which has incentivised the low carbon ambitions of the devolved nations may also result in lost opportunities.

  • 1st February 2019

    The outcome of the various Commons votes this week left certain only that the Government would either secure an amended deal and put it to a meaningful vote on Wednesday 13 February, or in the overwhelmingly likely absence of this make a further statement that day and table another amendable motion for the following day, the Groundhog Day that may lead to a ‘St Valentine’s Day Massacre’ for one side or the other. Richard Parry assesses the further two-week pause in parliamentary action on Brexit

  • 24th January 2019

    Concerns about the implications of the Irish backstop for the integrity of the domestic Union contributed significantly to the scale of the 118-strong backbench rebellion that led to Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement being defeated last week, by the extraordinary margin of 432 to 202. What do the arguments made during the Commons debate tell us about the nature of the ‘unionism’ that prevails in the contemporary Conservative Party?

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