Kim Swales

Kim Swales's picture
Professor
Kim
Swales
Job Title: 
Emeritus Professor
Organisation: 
University of Strathclyde
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Kim Swales is a Professor of Economics at the University of Strathclyde.

Swales is a graduate of Queens' College, Cambridge; his main research interests are in regional economics. In 1989 he joined the Fraser of Allander Institute to become a key member in an ESRC-funded project to develop a macro-micro model of the Scottish economy (AMOS).

He has published widely in the field of regional economics, regional modelling and regional policy and until recently was associate editor of Regional Studies and is on the management committee of the ESRC Urban and Regional Study Group.

In particular, he has worked with various novel approaches to helping unemployment such as tax breaks on value-added tax.

Swales is a coauthor of an alternative approach to the minimum wage submitted to the European Commission.[1] This provides incentives for a minimum wage without mandating it, by using tax breaks per employee to reduce the value added tax paid by employers. The report of the team's modelling states that this would not only increase employment levels but also increase GDP, i.e. it would reverse any unemployment and deadweight loss effects of a mandated minimum wage, acting as a Pigovian subsidy.

Project Job Role: 
The Economy, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

Blog
View recent blog entries
Member for
3 years 4 months

Latest blogs

  • 23rd June 2018

    The end of Free Movement following Brexit will have a dramatic impact on the ability of all areas of the UK to attract low-skilled labour. Dr Sarah Kyambi considers the impact of the change in Scotland and whether now is the time to devolve immigration policy.

  • 21st June 2018

    New research conducted by the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow suggests that a post-Brexit Scotland is likely to find itself losing out on much-needed low-skilled migrant labour from the European Economic Area (EEA) to English-speaking countries such as North America, Australia, and to countries within the EEA.

  • 19th June 2018

    Following the collapse of the Rajoy government following a corruption scandal, how does the new political landscape affect the constitutional debate in Catalonia? Prof Antonia María Ruiz Jiménez of Universidad Pablo de Olavide suggests that this apparently dramatic change will make relatively little difference.

  • 13th June 2018

    While populist leaders and movements make headlines worldwide, an often more subtle majority nationalism remains an endemic condition of the modern world. This phenomenon is comparatively understudied. The Centre on Constitutional Change invites calls for abstracts for an international workshop on the topic of majority nationalism, to be held in February 2019.

  • 31st May 2018

    The recent report by the Growth Commission contains some interesting ideas, says Michael Keating, but also makes some problematic assumptions.

Read More Posts