Julia Darby

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Professor
Julia
Darby
Organisation: 
University of Strathclyde
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Biography: 

Prof. Darby is a Professor in the Department of Economics. She joined the University in 2003, having previously worked at the Universities of Glasgow and Stirling and at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research in London.Her research is predominantly in the field of applied macroeconomics, particularly focusing on issues in fiscal policy.

She teaches a range of classes in Macroeconomics, Economic Policy and Econometrics to undergraduate and masters students at Strathclyde and to students on the Scottish Graduate Programme in Economics at Edinburgh.

She's currently Director of Postgraduate Research within the Deparment.

History

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2 years 9 months

Latest blogs

  • 19th October 2018

    Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

  • 16th October 2018

    Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

  • 15th October 2018

    As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.

  • 13th October 2018

    Theresa May’s efforts to keep her DUP allies onside may, suggests Prof Nicola McEwen, end up easing Nicola Sturgeon’s path to independence following any subsequent referendum on the subject.

  • 12th October 2018

    The Commission on Justice in Wales, chaired by Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, will further clarify the legal and political identity of Wales within the UK constitution. Doing so, explains Prof Dan Wincott, will also bring clarity to the enduring significance of other territorial legal jurisdictions.

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