James Mitchell

James Mitchell's picture
Professor
James
Mitchell
Job Title: 
Professor of Public Policy
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 
James Mitchell holds the Chair in Public Policy at Edinburgh University having previously been Professor of Politics at Strathclyde University and of Public Policy at Sheffield University.  He is the author of a dozen books on government, politics and public policy and over 50 articles in academically refereed journals.  His most recent book, The Scottish Question (Oxford University Press, 2014) puts the current constitutional debate into a wider historical and broader social and economic context.  He co-directs Edinburgh University’s Academy of Government and the ESRC/Scottish Government-funded What Works Scotland network, the latter building on the work of the Christie Commission on the Delivery of Public Services of which he was a member.
 

http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/politics/james_mitchell

Recent books:

The Scottish Question (Oxford University Press June 2014)

http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199688654.do

More Scottish Than British (Palgrave Macmillan February 2014) co-authored with C. Carman and R. Johns

http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=579701

After Independence (Luath Press 2013) Co-edited with Gerry Hassan

http://www.luath.co.uk/after-independence.html

Project Job Role: 
Professor of Public Policy

History

Blog
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Member for
4 years 11 months

Posts by this author:

James Mitchell looks forward to the SNP Conference which is likely to be remembered most for its timing: the postponement of the Prime Minister’s decision to invoke Article 50 formally starting the process of Brexit and the First Minister’s decision on the timing of Indyref2. The SNP meets once more... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
James Mitchell (@ProfJMitchell) discusses how Nicola Sturgeon’s decision on the timing of the independence referendum is likely to be the most important of her leadership. This post originally appeared on the Academy of Governent blog. One issue will dominate discussion at the SNP conference in Glas... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
James Mitchell discusses how the tables appear to have turned and Tories in London are looking to Scotland and Ruth Davidson for inspiration. This blog originally appeared on the Academy of Government website. For three decades, senior Tories in London were perplexed by political developments in Sco... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The public could be excused for being unaware that the SNP is currently electing a new depute leader. James Mitchell looks at the candidates. This post originally appeared on the Academy of Government blog. The public could be excused for being unaware that the SNP is currently electing a new depute... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a piece originally published by the Local Govt Information Unit, Professor James Mitchell reflects on the implications of Brexit for local government.  Efforts during the EU referendum to put a figure on how much policy emanates from Brussels provoked wry smiles in local government. Measuring the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
There has been much speculation on the implications of the EU referendum for the unity of the UK. A list of EU supporters have suggested that a vote for BREXIT will lead to the break-up of Britain. But what logic lies behind these claims and what is the evidence that a vote for Brexit will precipita... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
James Mitchell discusses how at first sight, the Tories look to be stronger after the 2016 election than the SNP after 2003. This post originally appeared on Academy of Government @ Edinburgh University The Scottish Conservatives are smiling and with good reason. The party’s share of the vote rose... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The SNP machine has been quick to point out that the party has just won its (and any party’s) highest ever share of constituency votes.   The translation of constituency votes into seats highlights the disproportionality of that element of the system: 46.5% delivered 81% of seats.  This compares wit... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
We should, says James Mitchell, be glad that Scotland's political parties are debating how to use Holyrood's new powers but we should also hope that they begin to acknowledge the complexities - including the likelihood of unintended consequences - that those policies imply.   Scotland faces signific... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
James Mitchell looks at the approaching Holyrood election in May and how the SNP is expected to extend its lead despite the common view in 2011 that winning an overall majority was a freak, unrepeatable result. This blog originally appeared on the Academy of Government website.   Politics is an expe... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 16th August 2018

    A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

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