David Phillips

David Phillips's picture
David
Phillips
Job Title: 
Senior research economist
Organisation: 
The Institute for Fiscal Studies
Email Address: 
Biography: 

David is a Senior Research Economist, currently working in the Direct Tax and Welfare sector and the Centre for the Evaluation of Development Policy (EDePo@IFS). Most of David's work is arranged around the broad themes of poverty, inequality and the tax and benefit system and includes projects both in the UK and in middle income countries. Recent projects include analysis of the distributional and behavioural impacts of tax reforms in Mexico and El Salvador for the World Bank; an assessment of the impact of welfare reforms on labour supply in Wales; and analysis of poverty and inequality in the UK.He is also working with Magali Beffy, Guy Laroque and Costas Meghir on models of family labour supply, a piece of work that has grown out of his work for the Mirrlees Review. More recent research interests include local government spending and the analysis of fiscal issues in the devolved nations of the UK, especially those related to the Scottish independence debate. He also has experience analysing social capital, human capital and consumer demand.

Project Job Role: 
Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy

History

Blog
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Member for
4 years 12 months

Posts by this author:

In this observation, David Phillips of the IFS discusses what the GERS figures tell us about Scotland’s notional fiscal position in 2013-14. On March 11th, the Scottish Government published the latest version of its annual Government Expenditure and Revenues Scotland (GERS) publication on Scotland’s... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
On November 27th 2014, the Smith Commission published proposals for further devolution of powers to Scotland. We now know what is to be devolved – the UK and Scottish Governments now have the more prosaic task of implementing the changes. Getting the details of how the taxes and welfare are devolved... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This briefing note takes a step back from the big questions about whether there should be further tax devolution and whether there should be a move to a needs-based formula. Instead, it focuses on the more technical – but important – question of how devolved taxes should interact with the block gran... Read more
Post type: Publication
Paul Johnson and David Phillips of the Institute for Fiscal Studies ask whether the Scottish NHS is more financially secure within or outwith the union. The future of the welfare state, and particularly of the NHS, has taken centre stage in the Scottish independence debate in recent days. Scotland’s... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
David Phillips discusses IFS research on how welfare policy might be funded in an independence scenario, drawing our attention to potential funding challenges. The future of the welfare state has emerged as a key issue in the Scottish independence debate. The Scottish Government has said it would of... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
David Phillips of the Institute for Fiscal Studies shares his observations on the annual Government Expenditutre and Revenues report, reflecting on declining returns from North Sea oil. The Scottish Government has published the latest version of its annual Government Expenditure and Revenues Scotlan... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Designing an appropriate system of benefits and social protection is an important task for any modern state. The first thing the White Paper does is set out the broad principles that the Scottish Government says would guide its long-term approach in an independent Scotland. These include the better... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Guest blog by David Phillips, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) This blog originally appeared on British Politics and Policy at LSE blog In the run up to elections politicians are often less than fully open about their plans for taxes and spending. They often claim that they will only know what is... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
There has been a growing debate about how the benefits system (that is, the system of state benefits, pensions and tax credits) may be affected if Scotland becomes independent. This debate takes place at a time when the benefits system that Scotland currently shares with the rest of the UK is going... Read more
Post type: Publication

Latest blogs

  • 19th October 2018

    Proposed revisions to the Basque Statute of Autonomy have revealed underlying tensions but the fault lines are not where an outside observer might assume they would be. They are fundamental and political and, explains Michael Keating, unlikely to be resolved by technocratic debate.

  • 16th October 2018

    Bavaria’s long-dominant party, the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), has reached its worst election result in 60 years. As well as causing a headache for Angela Merkel, argues Patrick Utz, this political earthquake reveals Bavaria’s predicament between regionalism and populism,.

  • 15th October 2018

    As the buildup to the EU Council meeting reaches fever pitch, Richard Parry explains that deals at dawn may work in Brussels but they don't always play to the home crowd.

  • 13th October 2018

    Theresa May’s efforts to keep her DUP allies onside may, suggests Prof Nicola McEwen, end up easing Nicola Sturgeon’s path to independence following any subsequent referendum on the subject.

  • 12th October 2018

    The Commission on Justice in Wales, chaired by Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, will further clarify the legal and political identity of Wales within the UK constitution. Doing so, explains Prof Dan Wincott, will also bring clarity to the enduring significance of other territorial legal jurisdictions.

Read More Posts