David Eiser

David Eiser's picture
Mr
David
Eiser
Job Title: 
Research Associate
Organisation: 
Fraser of Allander Institute
Biography: 

I am currently working on an ESRC funded project investigating the economics of constitutional change. The project runs from March 2013 - January 2014 and is led by Professor David Bell. It explores a wide range of fiscal issues relevant to ongoing fiscal devolution to Scotland and potential Scottish independence.

Project Job Role: 
Research Fellow

History

Blog
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Member for
4 years 10 months

Posts by this author:

David Eiser discusses what the Brexit vote means for the Scottish Government’s budget in the short and long term. What does the Brexit vote mean for the Scottish Government’s budget? In the short-term, (i.e. until the UK formally leaves the EU), the answer essentially depends on two things. First, h... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
What is inward investment? Inward investment (sometimes called inward Foreign Direct Investment) refers to the overseas operations of a multinational. Inward investment can include the establishment of foreign branches and subsidiaries, and the acquisition of foreign firms. Inward investment is ofte... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
When Scottish Vote Leave launched on April 5, it had an eye-catching claim. The Scottish government’s annual budget would rise by £1.5 billion in the event of Brexit, we were told. It arrived at this figure by calculating Scotland’s population share of the UK’s gross annual contribution to the EU bu... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The suggestion that an increase in the additional rate would lead to a mass migration of wealthy Scots has been widely - and rightly - criticised, says David Eiser. However, the likelihood of widespread tax avoidance by higher earners is a very real one.    The SNP has been taking a lot of criticism... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Does Nicola Sturgeon’s refusal to increase the Additional Rate of Income Tax to 50p unless it is increased in the rest of the UK undermine the case for tax devolution? David Eiser argues that there were always going to be constraints on the exercise of devolved powers and incumbent governments have... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In broad terms, the Chancellor’s destination is the same now as it was at the time of the Autumn Statement. He plans to achieve a budget surplus by the end of this parliament, while reducing public spending as a percentage of GDP from 40% now to under 37% in 2020.   But whereas in Autumn he was buoy... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
After months of protracted negotiation, the UK and Scottish governments have finally found something they can agree on, says David Eiser - that two plus two equals five.    So, after months of negotiation, a deal has finally been agreed on how the Scottish Government’s block grant will be adjusted t... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the first of a series of analyses of the Scottish parties’ manifesto proposals from the University of Stirling and Centre on Constitutional Change, David Bell and David Eiser consider the Labour proposals for income tax announced recently.   After years of silence on the tax powers which Scotland... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Scotland’s First Minster suggested recently that the Scottish Rate of Income Tax is ‘anything but progressive’, but, says David Eiser, this is not strictly true.   In December’s Budget, John Swinney chose not to raise the Scottish Rate of Income Tax (SRIT). His reason for not doing so is that it wou... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
John Swinney's final budget before the 2016 Holyrood elections was billed as a Scottish alternative to austerity but, says David Eiser, it may have been Scottish but it wasn't very alternative.    We knew a lot of the context before John Swinney stood up to deliver his Draft Budget on Wednesday. Th... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 16th August 2018

    A week after the state of intergovernmental relations (IGR) in the UK was highlighted by the UK government’s law officers standing in opposition to their devolved counterparts in the UK Supreme Court, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee published a report on improving IGR after Brexit. Jack Sheldon discusses the methods by which England could gain distinct representation — something it currently lacks — in a new IGR system.

  • 10th August 2018

    Brexit is re-making the UK’s constitution under our noses. The territorial constitution is particularly fragile. Pursuing Brexit, Theresa May’s government has stumbled into deep questions about devolution.

  • 8th August 2018

    The UK in a Changing Europe has formed a new Brexit Policy Panel (BPP). The BPP is a cross-disciplinary group of over 100 leading social scientists created to provide ongoing analysis of where we have got to in the Brexit process, and to forecast where we are headed. Members of the UK in a Changing Europe Brexit Policy Panel complete a monthly survey addressing three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if —and when—the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future. The CCC participates on the Panel.

  • 2nd August 2018

    The House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee issued its report ‘Devolution and Exiting the EU: reconciling differences and building strong relationships’. Discussing its contents, Professor Nicola McEwen suggests that the report includes some practical recommendations, some of which were informed by CCC research. It also shines a light on some of the more difficult challenges ahead.

  • 31st July 2018

    The politicisation of Brexit, combined with deteriorating relations between London and Dublin, has created a toxic atmosphere in Northern Ireland, says Mary Murphy, which will require imagination and possibly new institutions to resolve.

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