Ailsa Henderson

Ailsa Henderson's picture
Prof.
Ailsa
Henderson
Job Title: 
Head of Politics and International Relations at the University of Edinburgh
Organisation: 
University of Edinburgh
Email Address: 
Biography: 

Ailsa Henderson is Professor of Political Science and Head of Politics & International Relations at the University of Edinburgh. Originally from Windsor, Ontario, she has degrees from the Université d’Ottawa (BScSoc) and the University of Edinburgh (MSc, PhD) and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto. She was an Assistant Professor at Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Toronto before returning to the University of Edinburgh in 2007. From 2006-2007 she was the Working Groups Chair for the Ontario Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform and is currently a member of the Local Government Boundary Commission for Scotland.

Professor Henderson researches comparative political behaviour and political culture in sub-state regions as well as civic engagement. She has published four books and over 30 articles and book chapters, including Hierarchies of Belonging: National Identity and Political Culture in Scotland and Quebec (McGill-Queen’s University Press 2007) and Citizenship After the Nation State: Regionalism, Nationalism and Public Attitudes in Europe (Palgrave 2013). A more complete list of publications is available here: http://www.pol.ed.ac.uk/people/academic_staff/henderson_ailsa

Professor Henderson is currently leading the political behaviour programme for the Scottish Centre on Constitutional Change, which includes the Risk and Constitutional Attitudes Survey, has been a co-investigator for all three rounds of the Future of England Survey and is principal investigator for the 2014 Scottish Referendum Survey.

Project Job Role: 
Public Opinion and Political Behaviour, Centre on Constitutional Change

History

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Posts by this author:

As polling companies try out different methodologies in the light of recent reviews of their practices, Ailsa Henderson explains how they determine who is likely to vote.    Different polling companies weight their respondents by a range of demographic characteristic to ensure that their quota sampl... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Whether GE2017 in Scotland is about Brexit or IndyRef rather depends on who you believe, says Ailsa Henderson.    Political parties in states where there are regional, linguistic or religious divisions face certain choices, including about their mode of organisation – to federalise or not – as well... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the event of another independence campaign, says Ailsa Henderson, both sides will need to find some answers.    The First Minister’s announcement that the SNP government intends to seek a section 30 order to hold a second independence referendum contained within it a few hints about the key messa... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Abstract   Canada’s history has been marked by competing visions of the country and regional grievances about how the federation works. Multiple and frequently conflicting identities and interests have sustained these historical tensions. This study explores how the growing visible minority populati... Read more
Post type: Publication
On the night of the 1995 Quebec independence referendum, twenty years ago yesterday, then Quebec premier Jacques Parizeau, who had campaigned for independence, suggested that the Yes side had been defeated by money and the ethnic vote, undoing decades of careful work on the part of the Parti Québéco... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The most recent results of the Scottish Referendum Study have been widely discussed in the media. The research invetigated what motivated Scots to vote Yes or No in September's referemdum. We'll be following up with a blog outlining the significance of the results and will post the video of the laun... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Scotland’s big question was resolved on 18 September 2014. Early the next morning David Cameron opened up the English question, announcing: I have long believed that a crucial part missing from this national discussion is England. We have heard the voice of Scotland – and now the millions of voices... Read more
Post type: Publication
A poll probing attitudes to the Smith Commission and its terms of reference has found that 63% of Scots support the full devolution of both taxes and welfare benefits, including unemployment benefit[i]. There were also significant majorities for the devolution of pensions (58%), energy policy (57%)... Read more
Post type: News Article
With two weeks to go until the independence referendum it is perhaps worth looking at what was happening in the final weeks of the 1995 referendum on sovereignty partnership in Quebec to see if there are any interesting parallels or useful lessons. At this point in the Quebec campaign the opinion po... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
According to new analysis published today (Friday 15th August), there is considerable public interest in the referendum campaign but almost seventy per cent (69.5%) of voters do not believe that either the Yes or No campaigns can predict the consequences of independence.Many voters are relying on th... Read more
Post type: News Article

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