Posts by Stephen Tierney

The framework for human rights protection contained in the Scottish Government’s recent  publication, the Scottish Independence Bill: A Consultation on an Interim Constitution for Scotland (see Boyle, Tierney and McHarg) is notable in promising a more robust form of legal protection for fundamental... Read more
Post type: Publication
Stephen Tierney reflects on the forthcoming draft independence bill and the constitutional implications. Later this month we expect that the Scottish Government will publish for consultation a draft Scottish Independence Bill. This would be introduced into the Scottish Parliament following a Yes... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The sixteen week ‘campaign period’ has begun, leading up to the vote on 18 September. In this period the two main campaign groups, Yes Scotland and Better Together, as well as the political parties in Scotland, are subject to tight spending controls.  These rules are legally binding and any breach... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney analyses proposals to introduce an interim constitution in the event of a yes vote, concluding that the referendum embodies the spirit of vernacular politics, and a constitution which explicitly outlines policies, could challenge this spirit. This piece was originally published by... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a post originally published by the UK Constitutional Law Association, Stephen Tierney examines outstanding questions in the referendum debate. As commentators we seem to end many of our contributions to the independence debate with the rather unhelpful conclusion that much remains, and will... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In this paper Stephen Tierney offers his view of some of the legal issues involved in the accession of an independent Scotland to the European Union.
Post type: Publication
According to the White Paper issued this week, Scotland’s Future, an independent Scotland will have a new written constitution (this repeats the commitment contained in the Scottish Government’s earlier White Paper of March). The intention is to replace Westminster parliamentary supremacy with the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
by Stephen Tierney, ESRC Fellow, University of Edinburgh An Independent Scotland and the European Union According to the White Paper an independent Scotland would seek to join the European Union, with negotiations ideally concluding by Independence Day 24 March 2016, resulting in a seamless... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Following the Edinburgh Agreement (in which the UK Government agreed to devolve the power to hold the referendum to the Scottish Government through a section 30 Order passed by the UK Parliament) the statutory framework for the referendum process has now been largely agreed by the Scottish... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The referendum on independence is still almost 13 months away and already most attention is focused on major substantive issues such as economic relations between an independent Scotland and the United Kingdom, and the ease or difficulty with which an independent Scotland would achieve membership... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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Latest blogs

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

  • 16th January 2019

    Fellows of the Centre on Constitutional Change respond to the rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement by the House of Commons and the impending no-confidence vote in the government.

  • 11th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses the unfolding drama at Westminster around no-deal scenarios. The deal ‘would be an uncomfortable outcome for the EU: providing quota-fee, tariff-free access to the EU market without any accompanying financial obligations; without any access to UK fishing waters in the absence of further agreement; and without any commitments to align with the majority of so-called level playing field arrangements’. For Tory leavers, what’s not to like in this negotiating triumph for Theresa May?

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