Posts by Stephen Tierney

Stephen Tierney suggests that the referendum outcome should be seen for what it is: a narrow but clear constitutional decision of the highest significance. This post originally appeared on the UK Constitutional Law Association blog. The past three weeks have seen a steady backlash against the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Following the victory for Leave in the EU referendum, Prof Stephen Tierney sets out the next steps in the constitutional process.    Initially nothing: the referendum by itself does not change anything in legal terms. The UK remains a member of the European Union until it concludes negotiations on... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Thursday’s election leaves the Anglo-Scottish Union on the brink. A combination of the first past the post system and the crystallisation of increasingly sharp attitudinal differences between England and Scotland has produced starkly divergent political systems which are now set to clash in the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The United Kingdom constitution seems set to be restructured once again following the general election in May, with the three main UK parties as well as the SNP and Greens in Scotland committed to implementing the Smith Commission recommendations, and with draft clauses for change already on the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The Smith proposals are radical: the devolution of extensive tax and welfare powers will make Scotland one of the most autonomous regions in Western Europe. It seems that only a federal system can manage these changes while also giving Scotland a continuing stake in the Union. Otherwise, as the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney asks is it feasible to address additional powers for the Scottish Parliament alone without also considering the knock-on consequences for the entire country? This post was originally posted on The United Kingdom Constitutional Law Association (UKCLA) blog. In the month of November... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney discusses how the Scottish referendum has not changed the borders of the UK but it has challenged the boundaries of our imagination. This post originally appeared on UK Constitutional Law Association Only 45% of Scots said yes to independent statehood, but a massive majority said... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Stephen Tierney and Katie Boyle Executive Summary This paper addresses the road to membership of the European Union for an independent Scotland. The UK Government and Scottish Government each undertook in the Edinburgh Agreement of 15 October 2012 to respect the result of the referendum of 18... Read more
Post type: Publication
Stephen Tierney and Katie Boyle Today we publish a paper which is the outcome of an Economic and Social Research Council research project exploring the legal issues surrounding membership of the European Union for an independent Scotland. We conclude that: There are strong reasons to believe that... Read more
Post type: News Article
On 16 June the Scottish Government unveiled its Scottish Independence Bill in an address by Nicola Sturgeon, Deputy First Minister of Scotland, to the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law. The referendum on independence for Scotland will be held on 18 September this year and commentators have... Read more
Post type: Publication

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Latest blogs

  • 17th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses a memorable day in UK parliamentary history as the Commons splits 432-202 on 15 January 2019 against the Government's recommended Brexit route. It was the most dramatic night at Westminster since the Labour government’s defeat on a confidence motion in 1979.

  • 17th January 2019

    What is the Irish government’s Brexit wish-list? The suggestion that Irish unity, as opposed to safeguarding political and economic stability, is the foremost concern of the Irish government is to misunderstand and misrepresent the motivations of this key Brexit stakeholder, writes Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork).

  • 17th January 2019

    Brexit is in trouble but not because of the Irish backstop, argues the CCC's Michael Keating.

  • 16th January 2019

    Fellows of the Centre on Constitutional Change respond to the rejection of the Withdrawal Agreement by the House of Commons and the impending no-confidence vote in the government.

  • 11th January 2019

    Richard Parry assesses the unfolding drama at Westminster around no-deal scenarios. The deal ‘would be an uncomfortable outcome for the EU: providing quota-fee, tariff-free access to the EU market without any accompanying financial obligations; without any access to UK fishing waters in the absence of further agreement; and without any commitments to align with the majority of so-called level playing field arrangements’. For Tory leavers, what’s not to like in this negotiating triumph for Theresa May?

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