Posts by Michael Kenny

Professor Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon discuss a new report from the Centre on Constitutional Change and the Bennett Institute offering a comprehensive analysis of the weaknesses that bedevil the machinery for relations between the UK government and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
With little enough fanfare, Cabinet Office Minister David Liddington MP set out how Britain will operate post-Brexit. Prof Michael Kenny and Jack Sheldon consider what he had to say.   Last Monday Cabinet Office minister David Lidington delivered to little fanfare one of the most significant... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Labour’s Unavoidable English Question   In 2015, the Conservative government implemented ‘English Votes for English Laws’ (or EVEL) in the House of Commons as a way of responding to the ‘English Question’. Labour, by contrast, has had relatively little to say in this area – but were the party to... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
"Will the Prime Minister provide a commitment today that no part of the great repeal bill will be subject to English votes for English laws?” This seemingly technical query – posed by the SNP’s Kirsty Blackman at PMQs the day after the Prime Minister had outlined the government’s plans for Brexit... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In the aftermath of Brexit, there has been an upsurge of interest in English nationalism. But what exactly is English nationalism, where does it come from, and what role, if any, did it play in the referendum outcome? In this extended article, Michael Kenny investigates. This article appeared... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The notion that English nationalism has played a causal role in the EU referendum debate has widely been both accepted and promoted. Alongside this is a portrait of two Englands; one progressive and cosmopolitan, the other populist and nationalist. Mike Kenny argues that this Manichean dichotomy is... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The UK government's recent defeat on its proposals to relax Sunday trading rules saw the votes of Scottish MPs prove decisive, although the policy would have applied only in England and Wales. Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny discuss why the English Votes for English Laws rules could not help the... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
As the European referendum comes to loom ever larger in British politics, it is apparent that a number of distinct, pulsating national questions will do much to affect its outcome. For a start, divergent views on this issue may well lead to the exacerbation of territorial tensions across the UK,... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This current reform is also likely to have wider constitutional implications. It is possible that it will in time lead to pressure for a more substantive form of EVEL, particularly if further powers are devolved to other parts of the UK. 
Post type: Publication
The government’s proposals for introducing EVEL are, on one level, an internal matter for the House of Commons. Yet they also raise substantial constitutional questions that extend far beyond the lower chamber, including whether it is appropriate for England to now be treated as a distinctive... Read more
Post type: Publication

Pages

Latest blogs

  • 11th December 2018

    Theresa May's public recognition of the realities of the Norther Irish border in her Commons speech withdrawing the Meaningful Vote was, says Jonathan Evershed, much too little and far too late.

  • 29th November 2018

    The Centre has welcomed a Pat Cox, former President of the European Parliament (2002-2004), as new member to its advisory board.

  • 19th November 2018

    Disagreements between the UK, Welsh and Scottish Governments are about more than inter-party rivalry, says Nicola McEwen, they reflect a very real disagreement about how policy can be made - and by whom.

  • 16th November 2018

    What has been presented as an endgame is really just the beginning of the process and what is being described as the 'transition' or 'implementation' period, says Michael Keating, is really the time in which the real negotiation of what Brexit means will take place.

  • 15th November 2018

    With the politics of the process changing almost by the minute, Richard Parry assesses the ‘stable text’ of the Brexit agreement.

Read More Posts